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Posted by on Jul 11, 2011 in Economy, Politics | 10 comments

Grand Bargain Basement: Pest Control

Last week’s brief attempt at actual governing by both the White House and the GOP Congressional leadership in trying to “go big” on budget deficit and debt ceiling solutions dramatizes how dysfunctional Washington has become in six months of Tea Party madness.

After two years of Democratic control and wall-to-wall Republican naysaying, the American economy was teetering toward recovery but now has to be kept from going off a cliff, as the leadership of both parties acknowledge.

Why? John Boehner’s willingness to negotiate a Grand Bargain has been undermined by idiot ideologues in his own party, led by his own deputy Eric Cantor who makes Karl Rove look like a statesman.

The nation is careening toward a disastrous default because a moronic minority of newly elected anti-politicians has made a religious mission out of preserving the Bush tax cuts for billionaires while tearing down Medicare, Social Security and other safety nets for the most vulnerable Americans.

“No tax hikes” has become the mindless mantra for those who were elected to curb the excesses of government but have translated that into a mandate to destroy it.

“If not now, when?” the President asks Republican leaders but, for an answer, gets a Cantor monologue on going back to the patchwork compromises his minions had negotiated with the Vice President.

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Copyright 2011 The Moderate Voice
  • The obvious problem: the people aren’t clamoring for a tax hike on the rich. It hasn’t gotten any public traction.

    Tea Party politics, however, has.

    How can sensibility prevail when no one supports sensibility?

    Someone needs to change the message (and change the messenger, for it’s clear the people are no longer interested in listening to Obama, Reid & Pelosi).

  • The GOP resistance to military cuts is a bigger deal to me, and not led by the Tea Party freshmen. The problem is with the old guard, who can’t react to the real crisis (the deficit/debt problem) with anything other than their tired mantras.

  • Hemmann

    barky

    “The obvious problem: the people aren’t clamoring for a tax hike on the rich. It hasn’t gotten any public traction.”

    Poll: 74 Percent Support Higher Taxes On The Rich

    The Quinnipiac University poll found that 60 percent of Americans among both major political parties think raising income taxes on households making more than $250,000 should be a main tenet of the government’s efforts to tame the deficit. More than 70 percent, including a majority of Republicans, say those making more than $1 million should pay more.

    61 percent say tax the rich to fix budget deficit

    where do you get your facts- err- opinions?

  • LOGAN PENZA

    Most survey results are easy to manipulate by using loaded terms like “the rich” in the questions. Such manipulations are why partisans from both sides can nearly always claim that “public opinion” supports them.

  • zephyr

    The GOP’s obsessive resistance to new revenue is part and parcel of the disparity in citizen representation based on income/power. Until that problem is honestly addressed in this country, our so-called democratic republic will continue to be a sham… and an auction.

    As for the Tea Party, I would hope by now their past admirers would be more than a bit embarrassed at the “results”.

  • LOGAN PENZA

    So its not a real democracy unless only progressives win, is that what you are really saying, zephyr?

  • zephyr

    Of course not, although it does seem to be a fairly constant refrain in your own head. This country managed to operate quite effectively through most of the 20th century by employing the sensibilities of the same people who you now label as “progressives”. On the other hand, I’ve yet to see the people you constantly run interference for accomplish anything of lasting value. I guess if all you care about is a war of perception then you’re on the right track.

  • DLS

    Actually, liberalism ran itself and the nations practicing it aground, notably, in the 1970s. (You’d think, given worse European experiences and the much worse future demographics and more unsustainable, worse entitlement system there, that they’d pursue reform, but you see Great Tantrums when reforms are hinted at — strikes, demonstrations, riots. This, despite Greece’s recent example of where that political economic practice leads, eventually.

    Here in the States, our worst example was liberalism’s crown jewel, New York City — which bankrupted itself in 1975. It’s now been a running question among the thinking: which overspending states might bankrupt themselves if they continue to suffer fiscally but don’t reform. Even the EU couldn’t or wouldn’t do auto-bailout BS for Greece, and now possibly for other nations. There’d be even less support (among the principled, anyway) here for a federal bailout of states, especially profligate Blue states with retrograde attitudes about entitlements and government size and scope. The principled didn’t sympathize with NYC in 1975.

  • DLS

    Zephyr wrote:

    The GOP’s obsessive resistance to new revenue is part and parcel of the disparity in citizen representation based on income/power. Until that problem is honestly addressed in this country, our so-called democratic republic will continue to be a sham… and an auction.

    As for the Tea Party, I would hope by now their past admirers would be more than a bit embarrassed at the “results”.

    The Tea Party name, I typically ignore now, as the Left has so misapplied it as well as been so vicious and disturbed(ing) about it. Something about real democracy and rejection of, resistance to, abuses by government makes the fans of big government mad.

    A much greater and worse problem than GOP anti-tax hardness is the nature of the tax increases the Democrats are seeking, a set of envy-based and gimmicky, sucker-pleasing things, while so many on the Left exhibit the true insanity we have observed, the mindless denial of problems with entitlements and worse attitude toward any reform (like the Grecian tantrum-throwers, we have our Sanderses and Pelosis — ugh). It was true in 2005, true now. This, when not only is the fiscal problem we face one of spending (anyone with an IQ above around 20-50 knows it and won’t deny it), but especially of entitlements. It’s impossible as well as highly improper to expect to magically raise taxes (or just print the money once it is obvious as well as evident that not all of it can be paid for by taxes or more borrowing) to pay for everyone’s unrealistic assumptions, demands, expectations.

    There are even some of us [glare] that view entitlement reform (as well as tax reform) intelligently and anticipate that future retirees are going to discover that Social Security (and Medicare) are inadequate, and can think of ways to remedy this while making the entitlements much more affordable (and other reforms that make the retirees’ lives easier and better). (I’ve written about it.) That’s without the usual post-WW2 liberal BS entitlement escalation vote-buying rhetoric as well as unaffordable actions.

    Unfortunately, with liberal and Dem dinosaurs, we have liabilities we have to deal with rather than much-needed assets.

    [sigh]

    Thanks to them, it’s ensured true reform won’t happen until it becomes forced and which because of the wait becomes harsher.

  • Hemmann said:

    barky

    “The obvious problem: the people aren’t clamoring for a tax hike on the rich. It hasn’t gotten any public traction.”

    Poll: 74 Percent Support Higher Taxes On The Rich

    The Quinnipiac University poll found that 60 percent of Americans among both major political parties think raising income taxes on households making more than $250,000 should be a main tenet of the government’s efforts to tame the deficit. More than 70 percent, including a majority of Republicans, say those making more than $1 million should pay more.

    61 percent say tax the rich to fix budget deficit

    where do you get your facts- err- opinions?

    I said “clamoring” and I meant it.

    The T.P. is a very vocal group. They are loud and boisterous and have a lot of loud and boisterous supporters who’ve made a lot of loud and boisterous threats to lawmakers to “do the right thing”.

    There is no such voice on the other side.

    Where are the “tax the rich” rallies? Where is the outrage from that side? Where are the bully tactics to force congressman to vote for that side of the argument?

    Answer: there is none, or if there is, it’s limited to answering a poll question.

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