Isla Vista Killer Rodger began spree by stabbing to death three roommates

More info is flowing about Elliot Rodger and his killing spree apparently motivated by feeling he was rejected by women that ended in seven deaths, including his own. The latest tidbit: he stabbed three roommates to death in his apartment before he went on his shooting spree:

Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bob Brown confirmed the suspect was Rodger, a Santa Barbara City College student and son of a film director.He accused Rodger, 22, of killed six people before taking his own life.

The narrative of the violence described by authorities share striking similarities to a 140-page statement Rodger wrote in which he described plans to kill people.

Brown said deputies had three earlier dealings with Rodger, including a welfare check last month after family members called expressing concern about his health. The deputies said Rodger seemed to be fine and did not take any action against him.

Authorities said Rodger allegedly began his crime spree by fatally stabbing three roomates at his apartment complex.

That was just the beginning:

Officials said Elliot Rodger then went to a sorority a few blocks away and opened fire on three women nearby, fatally wounding two of them.

Rodger’s next stop, said Brown, was a local deli, where he fatally shot a UC Santa Barbara student inside.

The suspect them drove his BMW, opening fire on pedestrians and others on the street, Brown said. He then got into a gun battle with deputies. Apparently wounded, he continued to drive. He was eventually captured by police, who found him dead of a gunshot wound to the head that appeared self-inflicted.

They found three guns, and all were legally purchased and registered to him.

He has also left behind nearly a dozen videos — and a printed manifesto:

In the printed document, Rodger described his anger and alienation.

“On the day before the Day of Retribution, I will start the First Phase of my vengeance: Silently killing as many people as I can around Isla Vista by luring them into my apartment through some form of trickery,” he wrote.

“All of my suffering on this world has been at the hands of humanity, particularly women, it has made me realize just how brutal and twisted humanity is as a species,” he wrote. His life “is a dark story of sadness, anger and hatred. It is a story of war against cruel injustice.”

And:

Alan Shifman, attorney for Peter Rodger, assistant director of The Hunger Gamesseries, said the family had not yet seen the young man’s body.

Shifman said family members called authorities several weeks ago after being alarmed by YouTube videos “regarding suicide and the killing of people.”

Police interviewed Elliot Rodger and found him to be a “perfectly polite, kind and wonderful human,” Shifman said.

Or so they thought.

Authorities did not find a history of guns, but did say the 22-year-old had trouble making friends, he added.

And, indeed: his Facebook page is notable for something unusual: it’s almost all selfies — and not one friend.

SEE EARLIER POST HERE WITH HIS RETRIBUTION VIDEO
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  • http://themoderatevoice.com/ RON BEASLEY

    His parents had seen the videos and notified the police but they did not follow up. This is a problem!

  • ShannonLeee

    the police or parents.. or both?

  • sheknows

    How could no one follow up on a terroristic threat in this day and age? It isn’t like it’s something new!
    His parents especially will have to live their lives knowing they might have done more to help their sick son.
    Tragic for the families of these victims, his included….so tremendously sad.

  • JSpencer

    It sure seems like someone dropped the ball on this one. If I was a bible thumper I’d say I hope he burns in hell. We are seeing more and more of this sickness…

  • ROBERT COUTINHO

    If I had to hazard a guess, I believe that police departments throughout the country probably get calls about people and their internet posts on a daily basis. In a country that allows free speech (granted, threatening violence is not actually protected), what someone posts on the internet is not likely to be a sufficient motivation for the DA to seek an indictment. I do not believe that the police “dropped the ball” on this one. They did go to the young man’s apartment and found him to be behaving in a rational manner.

    What more do you expect from them???

    These are police officers, not mental health professionals. They talked to the man and found him to be polite and courteous. That is about all they can do. They did not have probable cause to search the premises. They did not have the authority to simply lock him up. We are a nation of laws, not a nation of fear!

  • sheknows

    As a parent, I am just confused by a situation where your child exhibits sociopathic/ suicidal behavior and it progresses to this.

    I seriously doubt that he didn’t display acting out behaviors for most of his childhood. As a parent, you just know when there is something missing in your child…something not right.
    Maybe we will hear of his years in therapy as this tragedy unfolds.

  • StockBoyLA

    Sheknows, I believe his parents did know something was not right with him.

    In his manifesto he writes about the disagreements he had with his family. His parents were divorced, his father had a live-in girlfriend. His parents seemed to have joint custody as they traded weeks to have him. The heated disagreements he got into with his father’s girlfriend led him to being banned (once he turned 18) from his father’s house for periods of time. He talk about being bullied in school, but he also talks about being the instigator in conflicts to gain people’s attention. He did have some friends in his teen years, which he got into disagreements with. There is a reference to seeing a psychologist as early as 13 and he was seeing psychologists recently (though it was hard to tell from his writing how often he saw them). I believe that his parents were very concerned and did everything they could to help. As a teenager, one time his parents waited until the last minute before telling him he was going to summer camp (he believes his parents waited until the last minute to tell him because they did not want to put up with his attitude). I don’t know what the psychologists’ diagnosis were, but perhaps they thought the first steps to help him with his social anxiety was to get him out of the house, on his own, and to see social councilors (which he did). Knowing of his anti-social behavior, his verbal fighting and narcissistic personality, I can’t help but wonder whether his mother was a little afraid of him before sending him off to school in Santa Barbara. I’m not sure what else they could do. He talks about hiding his thoughts and manipulating others. He mentions several times about people being suspicious when he was trying to cover something up.