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Posted by on Nov 20, 2009 in Politics, Society | 9 comments

Sarah Palin Loves Meat

palin_moose1.jpg

So many tasty morsels so many are uncovering. (All that and not one link to Andrew Sullivan. I’ll spend Saturday enjoying his finds.) One topic Sarah touches on that’s relevant to my interest in food is her love of meat. From page 18:

I love meat. I eat pork chops, thick bacon-burgers, and the seared fatty edges of a medium-well-done steak. But I especially love moose and caribou.

Note, especially, the medium-well-done. Sarah’s confident that those few liberals who still eat meat eat it rare, medium rare, or (for the snootiest among them) bleu. Moving on, from page 133:

I also trimmed the state food budget by keeping our home’s freezer stocked with wild seafood we caught ourselves, as well as organic protein sources hunted by friends and family. We kept an interesting variety of food that way. If any vegans came over for dinner, I could whip them up a salad, then explain my philosophy on being a carnivore: If God had not intended for us to eat animals, how come He made them out of meat?

Italics are Sarah’s. You have to love the gratuitous swipe at that most liberal of all liberals, the vegan. I imagine Sarah’s spotted them driving their Prius’s on her not infrequent forays into urban areas outside of Alaska.

She goes on to explain the challenges of hunting while serving as governor: Hollywood pressure to ban guns, halt hunting, and save wildlife. For Sarah, doing the governor’s job while hunting and fighting off liberals and raising kids and “cooking dinner and washing dishes” (page 108) was no obstacle.

What Sarah is espousing is a proud Conservative version of the liberal foodie. From page 134:

People outside of Alaska are often clueless about our reliance on natural food sources. (You know you’re in Alaska when at least twice a year your kitchen doubles as a meat-processing plant.) They don’t use common sense in considering why our biologists need responsible tools for abundant game management. But as the ninety-year-old Alaska Native leader Sydney Hunnington told Todd, “Nowadays, common sense is an endangered species.”

So wonderfully clear and clean and natural. Can’t we just all agree with her on that? Of course we can! But I’m left wondering, has she ever seen a CAFO? And what, exactly, does she believe “responsible tools for abundant game management” are? No further word on that.

For the record, I’m an omnivore with retrovore tendencies. I ponder the difference between animal rights and animal welfare. And I, too, eat meat.

Via this week’s delectable doubleX Gabfest.

BONUS VIDEO: Fans gone mad…