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Posted by on Mar 25, 2010 in International, Media, Places, Politics, Society, War | 7 comments

Mexicans Doubtful of U.S. Committment to Drug War: El Universal, Mexico

Hot on the heels of a visit by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, Defense Secretary Gates and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Admiral Mike Mullen, this editorial from Mexico’s El Universal expresses hope – but skepticism – that the Obama Administration grasps the seriousness of the Drug War in Mexico, and the threat it poses to the United States. On the other hand, the editorial also makes clear that there is no desire to see U.S. bases or troops on Mexican soil.

The El Universal editorial says in part:

Until a few days ago, Mexico wasn’t so important to the United States. Only after the assassinations of two of its officials on Mexican soil did it understand the gravity of the violence at its door. It remains to be seen if this time, words will become deeds.

A few months after taking office, the Democrat visited Mexico after a “mea culpa” by his secretary of state, Hillary Clinton. For the first time in history, the people of the United States accepted, without restriction, their enormous responsibility for drug consumption and arms trafficking. But subsequent actions didn’t reflect this supposed concern. The budget for the Merida Initiative was reduced by so much that it now only represents the equivalent of what the U.S. spends in Iraq in a single day. Moreover, there hasn’t been a single change in policy designed to prevent addiction among the U.S. population, nor has anything changed with regard to arms trafficking.

The United States must understand that its level of integration with Mexico shouldn’t be measured in miles – but in time. Our commercial, cultural and even blood ties grow deeper every day – but convergence cannot mean fusion. The limit is the presence of foreign troops and military bases on Mexican soil.

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  • DLS

    “For the first time in history, the people of the United States accepted, without restriction, their enormous responsibility for drug consumption and arms trafficking. But subsequent actions didn’t reflect this supposed concern.”

    It’s worth revisiting this because Californian legalization of marijuana is in the news, and with it, what the Obama administration has done.

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/03/24/MNDI1CHAMR.DTL

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-marijuana-initiative25-2010mar25,0,4756689.story?track=rss

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/10/19/new-medical-marijuana-pol_n_325426.html

    http://www.salon.com/news/opinion/glenn_greenwald/2009/10/19/drugs

    It’s not only cowardly game-playing here at home (if Obama doesn’t want to prosecute because he believes that is wrong, then repeal federal drug laws) but definitely sends the wrong message to Mexico.

  • bajabill

    I think it was interesting to have the national health care vote swirling around, taking top priority while Mrs. Clinton and the “Top Guns” swiftly went in to Mexico – acting “upset” – that some of “ours” got shot?

    I agree we have never embraced Mexico…

  • ProfElwood

    I’ve always been surprised at how little people care about all the violent deaths that result from the black market over here. It’s a little disconcerting that we care more about who is killing than how many are killed, but I’m glad it’s getting more attention.

  • malcolmkyle

    No amount of money, police powers, weaponry, wishful thinking or pseudo-science will make our streets safer; only an end to prohibition can do that. How much longer are you willing to foolishly risk your own survival by continuing to ignore the obvious, historically confirmed solution?

    If you support prohibition then you’ve helped trigger the worst crime wave in history.

    If you support prohibition you’ve a helped create a black market with massive incentives to hook both adults and children alike.

    If you support prohibition you’ve helped to make these dangerous substances available in schools and prisons.

    If you support prohibition you’ve helped raise gang warfare to a level not seen since the days of alcohol bootlegging.

    If you support prohibition you’ve helped create the prison-for-profit synergy with drug lords.

    If you support prohibition you’ve helped remove many important civil liberties from those citizens you falsely claim to represent.

    If you support prohibition you’ve helped put previously unknown and contaminated drugs on the streets.

    If you support prohibition you’ve helped to escalate Theft, Muggings and Burglaries.

    If you support prohibition you’ve helped to divert scarce law-enforcement resources away from protecting your fellow citizens from the ever escalating violence against their person or property.

    If you support prohibition you’ve helped overcrowd the courts and prisons, thus making it increasingly impossible to curtail the people who are hurting and terrorizing others.

    If you still support prohibition then prepare yourself for even more death, corruption, sickness, imprisonment, unemployment, foreclosed homes, and the complete loss of the rule of law and the Bill of Rights.

  • rudi

    Years ago it was Columbian cartels that lead the drugs trade. With our help the cartels were cleaned up. The illegal trade moved to Mexico in the ensuing vacuum. The US demand and prohibition is the problem, not the thugs in Nuevo Laredo…

    • ProfElwood

      We’re slowly trying to bring the business closer to home. Progress!

  • DLS

    It’s interesting that the upcoming California vote is happening. I’ve been against the Drug War and its worst features, like asset forfeiture (property seizures) and how that has corrupted police behavior (made it in its worst cases like drug gangs who attack the wrong households and people in “settling” some disputes). But I’m not in favor of immature, licentious, unrealistic behavior that accompanies the reform crowd, sadly. And we know that some of the motivation behind the California effort is tax revenue for a desperate, badly-run liberal state that has led itself close to bankruptcy. (a legalized gambling case on steroids)

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