Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Jun 12, 2013 in Featured, Politics | 27 comments

Edward Snowden Tells South China Morning Post He Chose Hong Kong to Expose Criminality

edward (1)BREAKING:  NSA leaker Edward Snowden, who fled to Hong Kong after disclosing classified information to the Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald, is still talking. This time he spoke to South China Morning Post.

“People who think I made a mistake in picking HK as a location misunderstand my intentions. I am not here to hide from justice; I am here to reveal criminality,” said Snowden told the Post earlier today.

He vowed to fight any extradition attempt by the US government, saying: “My intention is to ask the courts and people of Hong Kong to decide my fate. I have been given no reason to doubt your system.’’

It is believed the US is pursuing a criminal investigation, but no extradition request has yet been filed. Hong Kong has an extradition treaty with the US, although analysts say any attempts to bring Mr Snowden to America may take months and could be blocked by Beijing. Source: South China Morning Post

The newspaper said watch for full story coming shortly. It seems to me like Edward Snowden is taking a victory lap after committing a serious crime.

This was cross-posted from The Hinterland Gazette.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2013 The Moderate Voice
  • slamfu

    If what he did is a crime, we need to change the laws.

  • epiphyte

    It needed to be done and all – but someone should let him know he needs to keep the Messiah complex in check if he wants to win friends and influence people.

  • slamfu

    I don’t expect him to be a professional at PR. He’s just a guy, and a tech geek at that, bear that in mind. And the world is out to get him right now. I expect him to make all kinds of blunders in his communications with the press about this, most of us would. Even professional media people and politicians come off as idiots sometime, and they live and get paid to be in front of the microscope.

  • Willwright

    Well he’s had his 15 minutes of fame. My suggestion is that the U.S. government do nothing about extradition. That will leave him with nothing to talk about and no coverage which is probably what he wants. After a month or two he will tire of Chinese food and probably return to the U.S. They can arrest him then and decide what to do with him then.

  • sheknows

    Hong Kong is well known for it’s citizens fighting for Democracy and individual freedoms. In that respect he chose a good place. He may have made a big mistake though, in overlooking their extradition agreement with the US.
    It sounds like he is hoping that the HongKongians will take to the street to defend his disclosure of a US violation of civil rights. Hmmmm….

  • DORIAN DE WIND, Military Affairs Columnist

    Some believe that Snowden’s exposé is justified because it reveals alleged spying by our government on U.S. citizens.

    Now, in Hong Kong, Snowden is claiming that the U.S. government has been hacking Hong Kong and Chinese networks for at least four years.

    He claimed the agency had hundreds of targets – including the Chinese University of Hong Kong – from as far back as 2009, but that these were just a fraction of the 61,000 NSA hacking operations carried out globally.

    Cyberwarfare is probably one of the most powerful means of defense and attack in any future military involvement. Some refer to it as our national security “crown jewels.”

    It is already used against us by countries such as, yes, China.

    How in heavens does Snowden’s latest bean-spilling relate to protecting the privacy and civil rights of American citizens?

    In my humble opinion it may make such rights more vulnerable to attacks, not by our government, but by foreign entities.

  • KP

    “How in heavens does Snowden’s latest bean-spilling relate to protecting the privacy and civil rights of American citizens?”

    I agree, this is not helpful. Not a big secret but not a good development. If this is an example of the type of leaks he has planned, I would prefer he chooses martyrdom and leaves us.

  • Willwright

    Dorian, this guys credibility is certainly suspect, some of stuff sounds like he’s making it up as he goes along. He was a fairly low level employee, it’s hard to believe he had access or understanding to such a broad swath of information. He’s sounding more like someone trying to get attention by making sensational claims about things he actually knows little about.

  • DORIAN DE WIND, Military Affairs Columnist

    It is more than just about public opinion towards Snowden (or the US), KP, it is also about our own personal, economic and national security and wellbeing. China now can claim every excuse to unabashedly use hacking/cyberattacks against our commercial and other networks or take other “unspecified” measures, allegedly to protect their networks against our attacks.

    (Not that they need any excuse, mind you, but in the eyes of those not friendly towards us they have it now)

  • DORIAN DE WIND, Military Affairs Columnist

    @Willwright,

    Re: Credibility:

    In response to a Senator’s questions today during Senate hearings on the NSA program, the head of the NSA, Gen Alexander said with respect to Snowden’s claim that he could “wiretap anyone, from you or your account to a federal judge to even the president” from the NSA’s systems, “False. I know of no way to do that.”

    Of course, the NSA Director could be lying, too…

  • zephyr

    Well said Slam. Nonetheless, many perceptions will be formed based on slips and inconsistencies than what he actually did and why. He is NOT a public relations pro. Even so, we expect some regular shmuck to behave like a pro when he’s in an arena completely foreign to him – this being the international spotlight. Bottom line remains the same: This is about the conflict between security and privacy rights in a world which is still in the throes of a technical revolution. LIke it or not, it IS a legitimate and important argument. Some folks trust the govt when it comes to surveillance (if it’s their party in power) and some understand why that trust should never be automatically assumed.

  • KP

    It is more than just about public opinion towards Snowden (or the US), KP, it is also about our own personal, economic and national security and wellbeing. China now can claim every excuse to unabashedly use hacking/cyberattacks against our commercial and other networks or take other “unspecified” measures, allegedly to protect their networks against our attacks.

    Dorian, I thought the same thing. We are on the exact same page. But they don’t need an excuse. They (and America) are already doing it.

    This leak is more like part of an anti-American public relations battle. Which is why I said he can send himself to the cornfield and I won’t mind.

  • sheknows

    This is a Pandora’s Box and the things that are coming out of it can never be put back in. We have evolved into a sophisticated network of intricate programs and spyware that is everywhere in the world. I’m thinking we probably have very few secrets from each other anymore.
    Was the NSA director lying? Well the film footage of him when asked point blank ” are millions, tens of millions of Americans under surveillance each day”,? he said “no” while scratching his head and looking down. That kinda was a give away that he was lying…like to a 6 yr old who can’t even read body language to every American with an IQ higher than 50.
    Who knows who to trust anymore?

  • Willwright

    Dorian, it might be that the NSA Director is the one lying. If it is we have a much bigger problem than Mr. Snowden.

  • DORIAN DE WIND, Military Affairs Columnist

    Actually, that is what some are surmising, KP:

    By speaking with Hong Kong’s oldest English-language newspaper, Snowden seemed to be directly addressing the city he has chosen as his safe harbor. And by disclosing that he possesses documents that he says describe U.S. hacking against China, he appeared to be trying to win support from the Chinese government.

    If that’s what he’s really doing, then he’s not just a traitor or hero. Whatever else he is, he is also a geek chic fool for defying one somewhat repressive government and then running into the arms of a far more repressive government. There is no Miranda warning in China. There is no Bill of Rights. There is no right of dissent. There is only the Communist Party and its centralized power and its realpolitik interests.

  • DORIAN DE WIND, Military Affairs Columnist

    Hi Willwright,

    When I said “Of course, the NSA Director could be lying, too…” I should have used a huge SARCASM ALERT sign — sorry.

    As to, “Dorian, it might be that the NSA Director is the one lying.If it is we have a much bigger problem than Mr. Snowden”:

    You will have to forgive me for placing my trust on two men (Clapper and Alexander) who have given their entire lives to serving and protecting our country, rather than on a young man who could have gone to any of a hundred of legislators who are just dying to uncover one more scandal, or to another hundred of legislators who would be genuinely disturbed by his allegations and who (both groups) would have guaranteed him immunity from prosecution…

  • KP

    How about:

    1) I don’t trust Snowden

    2) It’s possible to have trusted and applauded Clapper’s service to his country for decades but it looks like he recently got caught lying (think Petraeus) and it may cost him his career.

    3) I trust Alexander. He certaily paid attention to what some considered missteps in four recent testimonies in front of congress.

  • epiphyte

    Clapper is a liar. Even Dorian admitted this yesterday. Alexander? I don’t know and to be honest I don’t care. What I want is to put in place a system with checks and balances which prevent abuse. Maybe something modeled on the US constitution, perhaps?

  • zephyr
  • DORIAN DE WIND, Military Affairs Columnist

    @epiphyte:

    Please don’t use my name to try to buttress your accusations.

    You know damn well that, in every instance that I have referred to Clapper’s alleged “lying.” it has been sarcastically or to rebut such accusations.

    Such statements don’t become you, do not help your credibility and don’t belong here at TMV.

  • SteveK

    Timely ‘Quote of the Day’ today:

    An education isn’t how much you have committed to memory, or even how much you know. It’s being able to differentiate between what you do know and what you don’t. – Anatole France

  • DORIAN DE WIND, Military Affairs Columnist

    I know what you are saying, Steve. But I can’t help being reminded of our lovely,brilliant, know-it-all (even the unknowable) SecDef’s words:

    There are known knowns. These are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we know we don’t know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we don’t know we don’t know.

    🙂

  • SteveK

    Thanks for the Rumsfeld quote Dorian… Those were the days we knew we were in good hands. 😐

    —————————-

    The reason the quote I posted seemed appropriate (to me at least) is it seems that there are many who think that a person with three months experience in a minor position, unaware of the big picture has more credibility than a career veteran that oversees the entire program.

    I have read comment after comment here, apparently written from the heart (or a strong gut feeling at least) on programs, and events that we know absolutely nothing about.

    Then, when those who do know what they’re talking about (Clapper and Alexander) attempt to clarify matters as much as they can without revealing classified information they are called liars based on… Based on what? Gut feelings?

    Ignorance is truly having a field day… Make sure to bring the kids and a picnic lunch. And an umbrella of course… In case it rains.

  • KP

    Those were the days we knew we were in good hands.

    Rummy sez…

    Dear Secretary Rumsfeld: “If you have sex in a hot tub, can you get pregnant?” —Molly Chaplan, Toledo, Ohio

    Secretary Rumsfeld: “Good gosh. Okay, yes, yes, you can get pregnant from having sex in a hot tub. In fact, you can’t not get pregnant from having sex in a hot tub, nor can you get pregnant without having sex in a hot tub. I hope I’ve answered your question, Molly.”

  • DORIAN DE WIND, Military Affairs Columnist

    Good one, KP. Would the water temperature have anything to do with it? 🙂

  • DORIAN DE WIND, Military Affairs Columnist

    Right on cue:

    The BBC:

    …in an online post, Chinese Air Force Colonel Dai Xu said: “I have always said, the United States’ accusations about Chinese hacking attacks have always been a case of a thief crying for another thief to be caught.”

    In a way, the Col. may be right…

  • dduck

    KP, I love DR’s explanations and I don’t care what he did in the past. My second favorite for explanations is Professor Irwin Corey; “Marriage is like a bank account. You put it in, you take it out, you lose interest.”

Twitter Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com