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Posted by on Apr 16, 2007 in War | 19 comments

Demand for US Pull Out: Six Iraqi Ministers Resign

Radical Islamic cleric Moqtada al-Sadr pulled his six ministers out of Iraq’s beleaguered coalition Government yesterday as he pushed his demand for the rapid withdrawal of US troops from the country, reports The Australian.

“The Shia hardliner, who has not been seen in public since October, was angered last week when street protests failed to persuade Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to set a timeline for US forces to pull out of Iraq.

“Nassar al-Rubaie, a leading MP from Sadr’s movement, flanked by allies from his 32-strong parliamentary bloc, announced the Sadr bloc’s withdrawal at a Baghdad news conference, reading a statement from the cleric.

Mr Rubaie explained the move. ‘The main reasons are the Prime Minister’s lack of response to the demands of nearly one million people in Najaf asking for the withdrawal of US forces, and the deterioration in security and services,’ he said…”

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Copyright 2007 The Moderate Voice
  • SnarkyShark

    Yep..I posted about this yesterday.

    This is a prelude to certain segments of Sunnis and Shiites banding together to start killing the outsiders who are wrecking their country.

    The good news is this means Al Quada and foreign Jihadist.

    The bad news is this means……….

    Publicly announcing you are going after Al Sadr in the over-hyped Splurge(tm) was another in a long list of bad ideas.

  • White Agent

    The story is the overall picture. Overall, I don’t think it possible that the Bush administration could have screwed up this “war on terror” any worse. “Stay the Course” leading to “The Way Forward”, What’s next, mass suicide to evoke Armageddon and the apocalypse?

    This whole mess is bizarre.

  • kritter

    The real question is whether the defection will deal a fatal blow to the already-weakened Maliki government. No matter how imbedded our troops are in Baghdad, the cards are in the hands of the Iraqis. Maliki wants us there because he would be toast without us, but if his government falls, will anyone else there want an American presence? Or just our money?

  • Sam

    Well this is just going to show that whether we like him or not, al-Sadr is capable of exterting actual influence in Iraq. More so than the “elected” officials that have no popular support around the country. We are spinning our wheels if we think we can put someone in charge over there without similar support.

    And since the current gov’t has proven itself incapable of providing anything for the common Iraqi in terms of security or access to daily necessities, instead opting for corruption and policy circle jerking behind thw walls of the Green Zone, they are not going to be getting any such popular support any time soon.

  • Rudi

    What will the hawks say if this sovereign government tells us to get out and doesn’t pass the pro-West Big oil bill in the Iraqis parliment?

  • kritter

    What will the hawks say if this sovereign government tells us to get out and doesn’t pass the pro-West Big oil bill in the Iraqis parliment?

    That Maliki has not been effective in creating a national unity government and needs to be replaced by a strongman who can hold Iraq together. Remember Hadley’s leaked memo? That’s what the WH really thinks of him anyway.

  • Nobody

    Publicly announcing you are going after Al Sadr in the over-hyped Splurge(tm) was another in a long list of bad ideas.

    Al Sadr left the country before the surge started because he knew it was him they were after. Announcing they wanted to go after him was an attempt to draw out his fighters.

    Geeze dude. Whats the point of having a War if nobody shows up?

    Man do I have to do all the thinking around here?

  • The U.S. government opposition to democracy both at home and in Iraq means that we will be there for the foreseeable future. The oil is just too important.

  • Nobody

    Actually the oil is important and I propose that about 6 months with no oil would translate to no Internet and no car and no truck and no heat and no air conditioning and no job and no food and no girlfriend cause you stunk from no water that:

    Chris would be leading the charge to the middle east to get his oil back.

  • DLS

    Sadr pulls his people out of the Iraqi government — apparently someone more sane had more say this time in the Iranian government. (This is more effective and less dangerous to Iran than committing kidnappings, and for that matter, terrorism in Iraq.)

  • Rudi

    DLS This is the second time that Sadr pulled the plug on his voting block. Hakim, SCIRI and Dawa answer to the Iranian Mullahs before Sadr. He’s more like Huey Long hiding out in Mexico. Sadr put nearly a million Iraqis into the streets, he’s more a nationist/populist than a Iranian stooge like Hakim.

  • Pyst

    “Al Sadr left the country before the surge started because he knew it was him they were after. Announcing they wanted to go after him was an attempt to draw out his fighters.”

    That worked so perfectly Sadr’s people didn’t even bother to fight us, but others did as the casualty figures show. Nice try, but doesn’t pan out at all since Sadr is smarter than to go into open warfare so you aren’t making a point unless that tactic failing is your point LOL.

    “Geeze dude. Whats the point of having a War if nobody shows up?”

    They showed up with brains, Rumsfeld/Gates are showing up with brawn. Long insurgency brains will always win, especially when it’s in the insugents backyard…like duh.

    “Man do I have to do all the thinking around here?”

    When you start doing that alert us all, it will be a true event to behold.

  • SnarkyShark

    DLS-

    I’m surprised you left out that other popular bit of right wing spin.

    That it allows us to open up another front.

    Of course anybody who studies history knows why this is a bad idea, but hey, we’re talking about Bushies here.

    Real men go to Moscow in winter.

  • DLS

    Rudi said:

    > Sadr. He’s more like Huey Long hiding out in Mexico.

    When he’s hiding in Iran?

    Hopefully you won’t deny also that Iran has influence and control over Nasrallah and Hizballah (Iran’s Lebanese proxy force).

  • DLS

    > That it allows us to open up another front.

    *sigh* Spare us your conspiracism.

    Attacks on our force would deserve attacks on Iran.

    We aren’t taking about invasion so much as air strikes. While these are less effective than an invasion were we trying to seize control of territory, that would not be our goal in Iran, which is huge, has many more people in it (who would turn from often US-friendly to patriotic defenders of their own country), and presents us with tougher terrain.

    Destruction of terrorist sites, Iranian military assets, and nuclear assets would be welcome if Iran attacked, with more, harsher measures if Iran counterattacked with missile or air strikes of its own.

    Our hands are tied in Iraq, though, and we’re not about to rush into undertaking more. But hopefully we’re prepared and ready (as the battle groups in the Persian Gulf should indicate).

  • SnarkyShark

    Uh oh DLS, except for the value of said air strikes, I agree with everything else you said.

    In fact, you even sound reasonable.

    If you guys would have laid off the hyperbole, and argued things on the merits from the git, then reasonable conversations would be the norm.

    In retrospect, running around like chicken little and calling half the American population traitors and terrorist lovers wasn’t such a good idea, wouldn’t you say?

    United we stand, divided we fall?

    Fortunately we are not so divided anymore. Roughly 70% now think Republican governance sucks.

  • SnarkyShark

    Hopefully you won’t deny also that Iran has influence and control over Nasrallah and Hizballah (Iran’s Lebanese proxy force).

    I think everybody understands that.

    Kind of like the way we control Right Wing Columbian Death Squads(tm) by proxy.

    Everybody also understands that.

    Aint Realpolitik grand?

  • DLS

    Issue #1:

    The Bush administration now says the departure of al-Sadr’s boys is a positive development for Iraq.

    http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&ie=UTF-8&ncl=1115422893

    How’s that for “spin”? Mira el ciclon!

    (Why Spanish? read on)

    Issue #2:

    > Uh oh DLS, except for the value
    > of said air strikes, I agree with
    > everything else you said.
    >
    > In fact, you even sound reasonable.

    Is the value too low or higher than I believe? Consequences too bad to support them?

    Issue #3:

    > … Kind of like the way we control
    > Right Wing Columbian Death
    > Squads(tm) by proxy.

    Not the same at all. Sorry, amigo.

    BUT — I cannot resist —

    You cheer for this guy all you want [leftist Castroite dictator and serious threat to Latin America ™] …

    http://theway2k.vox.com/library/photo/6a00cdf3a9bf0ecb8f00d09e4dc437be2b.html

    http://www.gregpalast.com/images/cards_Chavez-5H.jpg

    http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2005/01/30/17183521.php

    …while I’ll take her [her brother is linked to Right-Wing Colombian Death Squads ™]

    http://www.radio-canada.ca/nouvelles/International/2007/02/19/006-colombie-demission.shtml

    http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/world/archives/2007/02/18/2003349516

    http://press.jrc.it/NewsExplorer/entities/en/436610.html

    *wink*

    “Can’t we all get along?”

    http://english.people.com.cn/200608/17/eng20060817_294051.html

  • SnarkyShark

    Consequences too bad to support them?

    Thats my take. Essentially we have 150,000 Hostages in Iraq right now.

    I understand we can blow away boatloads of the Badr brigade when they attack by proxy, but human life in Iraq is cheap. In the process, we will lose more expensive $$$$ equipment and valuable highly trained personal.

    Also don’t forget the law of unintended consequences, which is working overtime right now.

    Blow-back would be a bitch, and possibly crippling in certain scenarios.

    I just don’t see Iran as the threat you guys do. I do think I see the blow-back already coming vis-a-vis Iraq to be a bigger threat than you do.

    So it all comes down to both of our opinions I guess

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