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North Korea has successfully conducted a hydrogen bomb test, the country reportedly announced Wednesday. The announcement came hours after South Korea’s meteorological service detected a 5.1-magnitude “artificial earthquake” near Pyongyang’s main nuclear test site. China, Japan and South Korea earlier said that there were indications the tremor was man-made, suspecting that North Korea may have carried…

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Guest Voice
  • rudi

    Please stop with the H bomb meme. The resultant tremor corresponds to a Hiroshima yield. The last couple of tests were duds, this one seems to a legitimate low yield atomic bomb. If the bomb was miniaturized, that would be serious.

    • Slamfu

      You sure about that? I really hope you are right. Man, H bombs are scary. How can that crappy little nation with a feeble $40 Billion GDP even have a nuclear program. They have less resources than most Fortune 500 companies. Course if you don’t give a damn about your people living in grinding misery and starving to death you can focus on the “important stuff” I guess.

      Have I mentioned I think North Korea is the terrible nation the world has ever seen? Worse than Nazi Germany or Stalin’s Soviet Union even. It’s literally like they got a copy of Orwell’s “1984” and said, “Hey, that’s a great idea, lets do that!”, and they did.

  • rudi

    Here is a couple of links with good info. The tremor from this test was nearly the same as the last 4 tests. Experts guess the yield at less than 20 kilotons. A H bomb would be 1000 times stronger. The USSR and US tested their H bombs on islands away from populations.
    Nuke 2
    Nuke 2

    • 1000 times? Not usually. 100 Kt to 500 Kt maybe, but 20 megaton bombs…? I don’t remember that in my Chemical Officer Basic Course training.

      • To add on: according to Wiki (yeah, I know…anyways) the biggest was up there (about 50 MT), but even still, the vast, VAST majority are much smaller than that. You don’t need to swat a fly with a sledge hammer; and you don’t need to blow away a city with a bomb that might be able to eliminate Rhode Island. After all, you want something to take over after all the dust has settled (about 100 years to be safe, btw).