Whole Foods Boycott Picks Up Steam (Guest Voice)

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EDITOR’S NOTE:
In the past we ran a line about Guest Voice posts not necessarily representing the opinion of TMV or its writers. But after we ran many Guest Voice columns by conservative talk show host Michael Reagan (whose posts we run usually once a week from Cagle Cartoons), liberals, moderates etc. we felt it wasn’t necessary to run that line at the top anymore. However, a reader now says this is post is being described as TMV’s endorsing the boycott. WRONG. It is a G-u-e-s-t V-o-i-c-e post from another writer by from another blog. We thought that was self evident but to new readers: Guest Voice posts are just that. This does not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of TMV’s many writers or the site itself just as Michael Reagon’s posts do not necessarily represent the site. And with our variety of writers, no one take on an event done by a TMV writer represents the site’s “position.” To those still confused, kindly read the description of this site above. Also see my own comment below since that is also being mis-stated.

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Whole Foods Boycott Picks Up Steam

by Richard Blair

Whole Foods CEO John Mackey shot his company in the face the other day with an anti-health care op-ed screed in the Wall Street Journal. He’s managed to piss off his company’s core demographic: liberals and progressives, and in the process, enabled a boycott that could actually work.

There is no doubt that boycotting Whole Foods would be a difficult proposition for many latte-sipping, Volvo-driving libruls. After all, where else are we going to spend hard earned grocery money for a $25 steak or a $10 pound of fair trade coffee?

The thing is, when Rupuert Murdoch published an anti-health care security op-ed from Whole Foods CEO John Mackey in yesterday’s Wall Street Journal, a few progressive latte drinkers decided they didn’t need to buy their arugula at Whole Foods anymore, and called for a boycott. After all, the big marketing gimmick for Whole Foods is that they’re a socially responsible company which sells food that is actually good for you (even if the products are very over priced).

As of today, the boycott is really picking up some steam.

(UPDATE: Whole Foods is now reportedly sending an email apology to customers who contact them, arguing the op-ed piece was not anti healtcare reform.)

While I don’t normally support boycotts (for the most part, I don’t think they’re terribly well organized or impactful), this one is different, and I do believe it can be very effective. Here’s why:

Whole Foods has always marketed itself to a fairly educated and financially secure customer base. This is why they can successfully sell healthy (and primarily organic) foods, at a higher cost. The company has also fostered the image that it has an altruistic streak in supporting progressive causes.

With a single op-ed in an uber conservative national newspaper, this wholesome image has been blown to bits. In the course of writing 1,165 words, CEO Mackey has caused more potential damage to the Whole Foods corporate image than an e-coli outbreak in the meat room.

In calling for support of the boycott of Whole Foods, I’m making an educated guess that their average customer is very politically progressive in nature. And that is why, if liberals and progressives quit shopping at Whole Foods, the impact would be quickly apparent to the company’s Board of Directors. By quickly, I mean by this coming Monday morning when the weekend receipts are tallied.

I am all for freedom of speech. Mr. Mackey had every right to express his views on health care in the WSJ, even as anathema as those views might be to progressives. Similarly, we progressives have every right to decide whether or not we want to spend our food dollars in a store whose CEO clearly doesn’t support the most important progressive cause of the moment.

So, if you are a Whole Foods shopper, please consider honoring the boycott, at least for a short period of time. The impact will be very evident, and almost immediate.

On a lighter note, take a few minutes and read the Whole Foods website forums on this topic. The forums have been invaded by freepers and redstaters, with predictably resultant hilarity. If one was to believe the freepers, Whole Foods is going to have an entirely new demographic shopping in their stores. The only problem is: last I checked, Whole Foods doesn’t stock Coke, Cheetos, Armor hotdogs, or 365-brand Instant Grits.

Some links:

Join the Whole Foods boycott on Facebook
LA Times: Whole Foods is in a whole lot of trouble
Whole Foods boycott on Twitter

Richard Blair is an old school political activist and publisher of “All Spin Zone” (allspinzone.com). He is a frequent contributor to AlterNet and many other online forums. His altercation with Nancy Grace in 2005 spurred the national media to get involved with the investigation of LaToyia Figueroa’s murder in Philadelphia. This is cross-posted from his blog.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This will be a setback for Whole Foods, particularly in California. Several years ago there was a major grocery store strike and worker/management feelings were bitter and there was picketing. Many customers who didn’t want to cross a picket line, didn’t like the situation or felt “their’ store were not stocked sufficiently “discovered” Whole Foods, Henry’s (a highly popular small competitor owned by Wild Oats, which Whole Foods bought but it quickly sold off Henry’s to the company that owns Smart and Final), and Trader Joe’s. These chains picked up LOTS of loyal customers — and many stayed with them. California supermarkets have been cutting prices, offering specials and doing all kinds of things to regain those shoppers ever since. Some did come back but others continued to put a lot of their food shopping dollars into….stores such as Whole Foods.

You can’t say that ALL of the store’s customers were Democrats, liberals, etc. But conservatives had mocked Barack Obama for of all things eating arugula — and Whole Foods typifies the mind-set of those who eat arugula and those who ask for arugula.

If you’ve never been there, Whole Foods is a wonderful health food, organic and gourmet store — huge and breathtaking in its choices, including freshly made deli items, baked goods and hot, delicious, just-prepared side dishes and entrees. It has a world-class vitamin section with staffers who are highly knowledgeable. Some stores have someone one offering massages. Their stores always have a friendly staff. They offer seminars on “wellness,” healthy cooking etc. A customer bulletin board shows business cards reflecting a customer mix with lots of “new age” people. Some call it “Whole Paycheck” because of its high prices.

But if a boycott has any impact, and if what the political class and internet readers and writers has filtered down to the average citizen, at least, Whole Foods could, as Richard Blair notes, have a problem. Online stories and blog posts generally note that Mackey made a huge business mistake or a political one. And it is hard to see those who mocked Obama for eating arugula stocking up in an organic foods, gourmet, store. Even with the company’s new disclaimer, it’s image will never be the same among at least some of its customers and soon-to-be former customers. And there is this: in the big California cities Whole Foods may be biggest game in town but not the only game.

FOOTNOTE: I love Whole Foods, but Henry’s is within walking distance of my condo, which is why I almost always go there. I originally went to the store in the late 90s, when I was doing a lots of fairs in Texas. I visited the Houston store so often during a one-month stay that friends joked that when I left Whole Foods had to lay off people.
–Joe Gandelman

UPDATE: See my note below. This clearly does not saying I am participating in the boycott. I don’t do boycotts. I can walk to Henry’s so I seldom go to Whole Foods anymore.

(CORRECTION: This mistakenly first went up under a Cagle Cartoons byline. This is a Guest Voice post, not Cagle Cartoons material)

Guest Voice posts do not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of TMV or its writers.

UPDATE II: Be sure to read a new post on this controversy:What John Mackey of Whole Foods Actually Wrote vs What the WSJ Ran: See For Yourself, by Dr. Clarissa Pinkola Estes.

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Author: Guest Voice

  • http://www.newshoggers.com/ Ron Beasley

    I never liked Whole Foods anyway. They are like Walmart without the cheap prices. They moved into the Portland area and drove all the regional stores out of business and then bought out the remaining competition, Wild Oats.

  • DaGoat

    I thought Mackey's editorial was pretty good. Which of his suggestions are progressives upset about?

  • Silhouette

    If I even smell a hint that any business is supportive of the anti-public option arm of MedMob's propaganda machine, it's not getting another dime of my money.

    *scratches Whole Foods off list of things to do*

  • TheMagicalSkyFather

    I will never again spend a dime at WholePaycheck. I will allow the frepers to now spend twice as much on groceries as me while I shop at a local COOP more in line with my personal philosophy. To be honest though I am not sure if I am joining the boycott due to annoyance with the OPed or the idiocy of HIM writing an OPed that would insight his customer base which happen to be largely activist. To me this is equivalent to WalMart coming out in favor of abortion and gay marriage, a very unwise business decision.

  • AustinRoth

    Once again, the Left shows THEIR instance on orthodoxy and crushing of dissent or heretical thought.

    Whole Foods must be punished for daring to have a CEO with a thought critical of the Chosen One, it seems.

    No wonder the American people have already realized what a mistake it was handing the keys to government to such lunatics.

  • DennisKnicely

    Although the Wall Street Journal article Mackey wrote has disturbed many, there is a lot of truth to his words, very well selected. This article has gotten HUGE publicity. Yes, it might hurt Whole Foods Market in the short run, yet could have favorable results on the long run.

    Mackey should be lauded for versing his opinion, all our rights under “Freedom of Speech”. Whether we agree or not, bad press is better than no press. Both Wall Street Journal and Whole Foods have received HUGE hits from this article.

    My opinion: The “left leaning” liberals calling for a boycott will come back, when they miss the high quality of the organic produce that is not easy to get otherwise, and Whole Foods will also pick up other clients agreeing with Mackey. http://www.HealingNews.com

  • aravinda

    For every “liberal” customer who boycotts there will be several new conservative hearts won. Organic is not just for progressives anymore. I am sure WF will see their bottom line rise – maybe a change in customer base was just what the store was looking for and has achieved by declaring that in America we not only have no right to health care, but no right to food and shelter either. All are best served by the market. Don't forget even if WF doesn't stock “Coke, Cheetos, Armor hotdogs, or 365-brand Instant Grits.” I am sure the food processing industry is coming up with smoothly packaged “natural” alternatives to these, if they are not already there. Whole Foods is FULL of processed foods already.

  • debbbb

    aravinda, you are so funny!

    A two for one swap. Incredible.

    Do you shop at WF? A conservative, after their first visit, hill run back to their conventional supermarket. Otherwise they would have been shopping at WF all along. You think they will pay 20%+ to make a point at WF? Doubt it.

    FAIL!

  • undertoad

    Does anyone know if Wegman's CEO has a position on cap-and-trade?

  • AustinRoth

    debbb -

    What a condescending load of crap. Do you really believe that only Liberals shop at Whole Foods, due to their natural moral superiority?

    It is that exact elitist, non-inclusive, arrogant mindset that is making the “Left-Liberal Revolution” of the 2008 elections fail so utterly in less than a year.

  • margaretwilde

    Too much is expected of prescription drugs and too few people realise how much harm they do by their adverse side-effects. I write as one of the many women greatly harmed by taking prescribed HRT.

    Good food/nutrition is a safe and very effective way of improving/maintaining health.

    As an example, by cutting down on salt/sodium and salty food and eating more fresh food you will lose excess weight, reduce your risk of most cancers, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, heart attack, vascular dementia, stroke, osteopenia, osteoporosis, hypercholesterolaemia, depression, liver damage and kidney problems, and improve your health in many other ways without drugs. This can also reduce many kinds of chronic pain.

  • seattlelefty

    I live in Seattle, and Whole Foods is opening a store about a a mile and a half from my house. Good luck getting me in the place! Let me explain in words that a wingnut free marketeer like Robert Mackey can understand. Bob, it's my money. I get to spend it, or not spend it, wherever and however I choose. I'm not going to spend my money to enrich wingnuts if I have an alternative. And here in Seattle, there are PLENTY of alternatives.

    Bob, I appreciate that op-ed. It gave me the information I need about Whole Foods. Free flow of information is critical to the functioning of free markets, including the choice to avoid your wingnut corporation. Good luck finding enough freepers in Seattle to support your new store.

  • Silhouette

    How funny…the GOP spin trying to recover the fatal mistake by their buddy WholeFoods..lol.
    *****
    “. This article has gotten HUGE publicity. Yes, it might hurt Whole Foods Market in the short run, yet could have favorable results on the long run”~ “Dennis”
    *****

    Oh dear “Dennis” didn't you know about the study that showed once people stay away from a product or store and then go find a better [in WF's case: cheaper but still same quality] they tend to never return? We'll write your quote on Wholefoods tombstone. I'm sure it will be a source of comfort for them..lol..

    [Hint to Wholefoods, fleas jump OFF a dying dog, not onto it...lol...]

  • jerrybowles

    Wasn't Mackey caught using a fake name in investment forums to bad mouth Wild Oats and drive the stock price down before buying them? Should have done a little time for that one.

  • D. E.Rodriguez

    “Once again, the Left shows THEIR instance on orthodoxy and crushing of dissent or heretical thought.”

    Well now, let's not forget the Right's Billoreileys who righteously demand boycottts of anyone and anybody with whose dissent and heretical thoughts they diagree with

  • seattlelefty

    I'm not “boycotting” anyone. I am spending my money how, when, and where I choose. This is my absolute right. Apparently, the far right wing doesn't like it when people exercise control over their own money. Imagine that!

  • CharlieScene

    A question for liberals, Why the hell should a company CEO's personal beliefs compel someone to not shop there? If you were willing to pay more money for overpriced food in the first place, (something I never understood seeing as I've bought all my food from Wal-Mart and Western Beef when I lived in New York City) how do his personal views affect the quality of the product at all, which is all that matters in a business. If he said something like, “Death to Jews” or something I could understand the anger, but he disagrees with a policy that many other Americans also disagree with, and a boycott just shows and reinforces the theory that liberals are completely intolerant of people who disagree with them.

  • marieburns

    Thanks for publicizing this. I didn't know about it, but now I'll link your post on my site. Also, for Whole Foods aficianados, most major & mid-sized markets have alternatives to Whole Foods now. I live in Fort Myers, Florida, which is a pretty small metro area — 500K in the county — but there are a number of shopping alternatives here, not the least important of which are the local farmers markets which — generally, but not exclusively — sell homegrown produce.

    The Constant Weader at http://www.RealityChex.com

  • gop08doa

    Charlie you're being an obtuse pumpkin head. It's the hypocrisy. It's what's decimating the republican party by and large.

  • http://www.blogtalkradio.com/msr Jazz

    Interesting and well written editorial by Mackey. Lot's there to think about. As to this “boycott” idea, it smells no less when the Left does it than when the Right does. So the CEO wrote one editorial you disagreed with on the pet agenda item of the day. So, hey… here's an idea! Let's try to drive them out of business! That way all of the regular people who work there will lose their jobs in an already crippled economy. And people looking for healthier food options (assuming you buy into that) won't be able to find them or will have to go further to search. And what of Mackey? Well, he's the CEO. He'll have a golden parachute and run off laughing his butt off at you all.

    Well done!

  • Kastanj

    “So the CEO wrote one editorial you disagreed with on the pet agenda item of the day. So, hey… here's an idea! Let's try to drive them out of business!”

    What would you do if a person with some prominence tried to support an outcome you believed would make your country worse? Why not hurt him financially if you can?

  • CharlieScene

    gop08doa, you did not answer my question and your immature name calling contributed absolutely nothing to the debate and reinforced the theory that liberals are completely intolerant. And how is Mackey being a hypocrite when he clearly stated that he was a libertarian long before his op-ed.

  • sandymchoots

    Boycotting Whole Foods isn't going to cost John Mackey very much money. From a 2007 press release:

    “Additionally, the Company announced that John Mackey will reduce his salary to $1 beginning January 1, 2007 and forgo any future stock option awards. Mr. Mackey will continue to receive the same benefits that all team members receive, including the food discount card and health insurance.”

    This guy actually seems to have coherent, independent, beliefs that he acts upon in his personal life. Why does that spawn such horror and revulsion on the left?

  • http://polimom.com Polimom

    “Why not hurt him financially if you can?”

    That'd make a lot more sense if Whole Foods didn't employ 51,100 (according to their site) people.

  • pacowov

    So much for that whole “Moderate Voice” thing, eh?

  • Lit3Bolt

    I would like to point out to all the tut-tuters on the Right that you are just as much defending YOUR orthodoxy by immediately rushing to the defense of a CEO you knew naught the existence of before this controversy. So therefore, if liberals hate it, it therefore must be good, logic any 3 year old can agree with.

    Also, thank you Jazz for revealing the conservative mindset that healhcare reform is merely a “pet agenda item” of evil Dems. But don't worry Jazz, we know you're a holy Moderate, because you added one worthless, equivocating sentence in your post! So therefore you can continue with your “Tee hee! I must be a Moderate because the left and right hate me!” act.

  • http://polimom.com Polimom

    By the way — I find it interesting that this post is tagged with (among other things), “war”.

  • CharlieScene

    I wasn't surprised, it is obvious that this is a war between Freedom of Speech and The Liberal attempt to shut down any one who does not agree with them

  • sandymchoots

    Isn't “spending my money how, when, and where I choose” pretty much Mackey's position on health care?

  • TheMagicalSkyFather

    What I find most funny is that boycotts since the 1980's have largely been the province of the right and to be more specific the religious right. Over the last few years as the left has been joining in and finding success it is no longer considered “voting with your dollars” even though this was the excuse used for every right wing boycott. Instead we get to hear about how boycotts are actually anti free speech and anti democratic which is pretty amusing coming from the party that commonly called the opposition terrorists or terrorist sympathizers over the last eight years.

    As far as people losing jobs, I agree that is the truly sad part about this though it was no less true with other boycotts, this one though actually has an advantage. If enough people actually boycott or just choose to shop elsewhere many of them will shop only for organic at major stores swelling the amount of organics they will carry or they will move to other organic stores and co-ops that will be able to hire more workers. Since grocery shopping is done locally I have real doubts this will cause major job losses as they will most likely be picked up by the business's that receive the added customers.

    I would like to thank my right wing friends for teaching me that if you buy from a company or a CEO with an opposing ideology than you they use part of the money you gave them to fund political parties and positions with which you may disagree. I would prefer if corporations and the CEO's that run them would just stay out of our politics as they have a giant megaphone at their disposal that others do not(I feel the same way about Hollywood) which takes any concept of equality and makes a mockery of it but if they choose to get involved I choose to make it an economic pain in the ass to do so.

    So they are free to speak their minds letting me know who it is counter productive for me to give money to and I chose to actually use that knowledge and act on it instead of just buying what I am sold and not questioning where it came from. I mean its not like I am banning him from playing on any country stations in the country if he chooses to become a musician I will just not buy his album. Now on the other hand if a station gives him his own show and he offends me on that show I have every right to take out that offense on advertisers of his program by withholding my money from them. Looks like we have a nice two way street here to me, with any luck all of these people will eventually learn to shut up if you care more about your finances than your politics.

  • SteveMG

    Good post, Mr. Blair.

    Keith Olbermann couldn't have said it any better.

  • daveinboca

    Hilarious! Here in Boca there are as many independents and conservatives as libtards at our Whole Foods, which is the second largest in the country after the Mothership in Austin, TX. I doubt that the centrist liberals in FL will listen to raving “:useful idiots” displaying obvious signs of poor nutrition and mental imbalance! Elrod will claim his Boynton Beach relatives will participate, but most of the clientele in Boca come from more affluent communities!!!

  • http://www.thepiratescove.us/ William_Teach

    So, let me get this straight: Y'all on the left have been screaming that those who oppose ObamaCare should have alternative. Mackey offers a sensible alternative to what Obama and the Democrats are pushing. Alternatives that many, many, many companies are already putting, or have put, in place, to reduce costs and expand coverage.

    So, rather than rebutting his position, and telling us why nationalizing health care is better than Mackey's ideas, you boycott his stores? So much for the tolerance of the left.

  • http://polimom.com Polimom

    Magical — you may be right that larger (more mainstream) groceries would potentially pick up the business by starting to stock the products WF carries/d. But the odds are beyond low that those 50,000 + people would all be absorbed — or that those new employers would offer anything like the benefits the WF folks currently have. (link)

    As it happens, I agree that one should be able to 'vote with one's dollars'. We all do that, I think, to some degree or another, every day. (For instance, I personally tend to drive right past the fruit stand flying the rebel flag, every single time! — and buy from another stand a few miles down the road.) But when your goal is for all of 'these people' to (your words) “eventually learn to shut up”…. ummmm…. I kinda hear something problematic there.

  • StockBoySF

    DennisKnicely: “….Whole Foods will also pick up other clients agreeing with Mackey.”

    Yes, I agree with that. Whole Foods will pick up other customers… until those customers actually step into a Whole Foods store and see the high prices.

  • gop08doa

    Didn't wingers threaten to “boycott” DunkinDonuts because Rachael Ray wore a scarf that reminded them of a burka in some advertising they did a year or two ago? DunkinDonuts bowed to their nutjob demands.

  • Lit3Bolt

    His “alternatives” are craptastic pipe dreams. Never once does he suggest how we achieve any reform. Then there's idiocy like this gem:

    “Finally, revise tax forms to make it easier for individuals to make a voluntary, tax-deductible donation to help the millions of people who have no insurance and aren’t covered by Medicare, Medicaid or the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.”

    To which I say, HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

    Then there's this:

    “A careful reading of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution will not reveal any intrinsic right to health care, food or shelter. That’s because there isn’t any. This “right” has never existed in America.”

    To which I say, there's no “right” for standing armies, no “right” to opportunity, and no “right” to political parties, etc, etc. Also, did I mention food and shelter are infinitely cheaper than healthcare? If it isn't a “right,” then why are all doctors and ERs required by law to treat people? Why? Why don't they have the “right” to deny people care?

    Then there's standard conservative screeds, like:

    “Recent scientific and medical evidence shows that a diet consisting of foods that are plant-based, nutrient dense and low-fat will help prevent and often reverse most degenerative diseases that kill us and are expensive to treat. We should be able to live largely disease-free lives until we are well into our 90s and even past 100 years of age.”

    So if you get sick, it's YOUR fault because you had that 3rd helping of ice cream when you were 5 years old, and therefore deserve to die for not taking care of yourself. Therefore, hospitals and insurance companies are free to refuse to treat your “preexisting condition.”

    He's an idiot. We liberals are free to exercise our right to free speech and vote with our wallets. He insulted his own clients, which is an idiotic business move. Idiotic business moves are punished by the “free market.” Conservatives are more than welcome to shop in our place. Knock yourselves out.

  • StockBoySF

    AR, “Whole Foods must be punished for daring to have a CEO with a thought critical of the Chosen One, it seems.”

    Many people are willing to pay high prices for the types of foods Whole Foods offer. Many people justify these high costs because they are supporting a company with values they have. At least until now. Now many of these people just feel like suckers.

    So…. Are you saying that people must shop at a particular store and pay high prices when they would rather shop elsewhere and support a store more in line with their values?

    The free market that Mackey so loves and supports may have helped him over the years, but it can also bite him in the ass if he makes a mistake. The biggest mistake a company can make is to piss off its core customer base.

    If Mackey wants to market to the crowd of people who “cling to their guns and religion”, then let him! It's a free market.

  • breadnjam

    Blair lays it out pretty clearly. I'm a long time WFM shopper who spends about $150-$200/week on groceries. I really love this store and I don't want to boycott them. I don't like boycotts and, like Blair, don't find them all that effective, especially if they're rushed together with no clear goals. Problem is, after reading Mackey's callous WSJ article, I don't have the stomach to go back to WFM. I shop with a conscience and I won't let another dime of my money find it's way to Mackey's pockets. I'm not boycotting. I'm just not going to shop at a store that Mackey has any voice in anymore.

  • RanMan2

    Speaking of Intolerance, have you seen the rude behavior at the town meetings lately? I don't think they are liberals! lolz

  • sandymchoots

    Lit3Bolt:

    There is no meaningful sense in which “food and shelter are infinitely cheaper than healthcare.” Figure out what you will have spent over your lifetime on food and housing, then compare it to what you are likely to spend on healthcare. I think you will find the numbers comparable–certainly not “infinitely” different.

    As for the “right” to a standing army, the constitution clearly gives Congress the authority to finance an army and a navy. This is one of the most fundamental roles of government. And the 10th Amendment clearly reserves to the people those rights not explicitly assigned to the national government, so there clearly IS a right to all forms of voluntary peaceful assembly such as political parties. The “right” to healthcare is hopelessly vacuous. What LEVEL of healthcare do I have a right to? From whom do I have a right to demand it? These are the fundamental issues at stake, and they deserve a full and free debate, not censorious ad hominem attacks. There is nothing “liberal” at all about intellectual intolerance.

  • Weeatourown

    Hey, hey, hey, dontcha know, only Republicans are allowed to have free speech. When Democrats reply back it's stifling Republican's free speech. Therefore Republicans should be allowed to speak whenever, where-ever, and however they want with no consequences ever and Democrats should just shut up lest they hurt real American's feelings and make them feel unloved.

  • dude1394

    Liberals are just funny, reasoned debate is a cause for boycott!?? Way to go girls…

    I'm not much of a whole foods shopper myself, but I'll be sure to go there this weekend and let the folks there know that I'm ONLY there because of a man who is willing to speak his mind.

    And liberals call conservatives fascists. Bull…

  • Bilwick

    I'm a libertarian who shops at Whole Foods despite the righteous “liberal” atmosphere of the stores.* I've heard that the CEO was a Rand fan and a libertarian, so I'used to be puzzled why the check-out-counter magazine rack always has collectivist rags and no pro-freedom publications. A lone REASON, maybe, amid all the pro-State propaganda. Then I just figured he didn't want to alienate his clientele. I've been wondering when that clientele (even alllowing for its dense, cocoon'ed consciousness, as evinced by its apparent Hive-mind believe that the State is our best pal) would catch on to Mackey. And now it has. Why? Because he dared indicate even a modest lack of confidence in “Il Dufe” and his policy. Horrors!
    These are the same people, by the way, who get angry when the State tries to regulate or limit food supplements. You can't have it both ways, retards.

    (*I'm using “liberal” in the modern, bastardized form, meaning “State-shtupper.”

  • monda

    Think about it who is more concerned about the environment – Republicans? (drill baby drill) or Liberals? Who believes in the green revolution? who believes is fair pay? So yes the CEO did piss on the wallets that keep him in business. Will i go back to whole foods? i don't think so.

  • pacowov

    “Guest Voice posts are just that. This does not necessarily reflect the viewpoint of TMV’s many writers or the site…”

    Ok, I get it now — The Moderate Voice exists to provide a forum for ranting extremists of the left and right. Thanks for clearing that up.

  • SteveMG

    BTW, SteveMG, Keith Overbite's ratings have declined more than 20% the last month as this tiresome bore and boor runs out of string on his BOR-bashing silliness. [In the same period, FOXNews has gone up 25%, according to TVNewser.] What about that, freak

    Sorry Dave, your sarcasm detector needs a new battery. My comment was entirely tongue-in-cheek.

  • Lit3Bolt

    sandymchoots:

    Food and shelter are more accessible than healthcare in this country. You can achieve both by yourself, but it is impossible in the case of healthcare because of barriers to care, some natural, such as doctors, and some arbitrary, such as insurance companies. There is no way for an individual to simply act as a “consumer” when it comes to healthcare, particularly when some people need it more than others, much much more. The “right” to healthcare comes from evolving societal standards which I think should be finally codified in law, not merely left to the vagaries of human charity and decency. My main point is that there are “rights” in the Constitution beyond the ones stated explicitly, because the USA has evolved beyond the Constitution in many many ways, some of which were added in Amendments, some of which were not but have become realities in society regardless (such as the President evolving into a Chosen Tyrant position in the US gov't).

    People have the right to accessible, affordable healthcare, just as they have a right to have an opportunity for work. There should be a minimum that everyone is entitled to, just as we have a minimum wage. Instead, we have a bizzaro system which ties employment to health insurance, which really does not make sense. No one is frozen out of all work because of a preexisting condition (well, unless you commit a felony, but that's another thread). It promotes “the general welfare” of the people as stated in the Declaration, which is also a “fundamental role of government.” And everyone deserves it, not just the old, the poor, and the disabled, for whom the government already provides healthcare. We already provide healthcare to all of these groups, yet piously declare everyone 18-65 without insurance should just “eat right and exercise” as if that will prevent any of these people from becoming sick or dying.

    As for intellectual intolerance, sometimes a rose is a rose is a rose. If some jerk CEO decides to insult his customer base by writing an unhelpful, patronizing, disingenuous screed in the WSJ, that's his right to do so, but I still reserve the right to call him an idiot by his words.

  • http://www.thepiratescove.us/ William_Teach

    gop08doa, Rachael Ray was wearing a scarf representative of the Palestinian Intifada, ie, terrorism. You OK with that? (Personally, I thought the right went overboard on it. I love my DD)

    Lit3Bolt, perhaps you might read the Constitution thingy, which does provide the USA to have a standing army. Try reading it for a change.

  • http://www.thepiratescove.us/ William_Teach

    gop08doa, Rachael Ray was wearing a scarf representative of the Palestinian Intifada, ie, terrorism. You OK with that? (Personally, I thought the right went overboard on it. I love my DD)

    Lit3Bolt, perhaps you might read the Constitution thingy, which does provide the USA to have a standing army. Try reading it for a change.

  • AustinRoth

    Gee SB, I thought they shopped there for the reason I do – better quality and variety of food. I didn't realize it was a political decision.

  • Lit3Bolt

    William_Teach:

    And that Army and Navy shall remain mobilized and in the field for all eternity? Where does it say that? Show me please.

    Congress can “raise and support” armies and “provide and maintain” a Navy, but my point is that the original words, regardless of intent, have come to mean something more above and beyond a strict interpretation of the text.

    Also, only Congress has power to declare war, yet the President can mobilize wherever he wishes, and if enemy forces just “happen” to be in the way…

  • TheMagicalSkyFather

    Polimom- Its a choice, they can concentrate on making a profit or concentrate on pushing their political agenda. If they decide to push a political agenda then people will be less likely to give them money if they disagree. If they instead decide to concentrate on profits then no issue exists but once they step into the public forum I have the right to tell them to shut up and sit down just like they have the right to tell me to do the same(note I said you can TELL not make). If I go to work for WF tomorrow and spend all of my free time around the building talking politics that differ from others point of view or offend people I would be fired because it hurts the company and its image. He has decided to use the clout that being the founder of WF's gave him to fight a position that offends many of his customers, if he were the PR person he would be fired for such a mis-step. Instead he is likely to take the entire chain down with him which is sad but he is personally responsible for the choices he made. I am sorry but I fail to see the problem with this. I have plenty of friends that refuse to watch this or that star and others that refuse to say buy food from McDonalds due to some anti-NRA thing they backed in the 90's. Choices have consequences and for CEO's they have consequences for not only themselves but for their employees and stock holders as well. Starting out your op-ed with the line “The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out
    of other people's money.” is him staking out not an idea but a political position. He is saying that the Dem's proposals that mostly are regulatory, as the Public Option is still very up in the air, is socialism. That is propaganda, if he wanted to state his ideas he could have done it a bit more carefully if he wanted to avoid offending his customer base but he obviously chose not to. I hope that in the future CEO's will learn that this is not a good idea for a company's financial success because I think they have about as much right to an elevated political platform as hollywood actors which would be none. He has a job to do, as do actors. If they want to reap the most profits then be nice, if instead you wish to take a stand then you are free to do so and I am free to take my money elsewhere and to tell you to take your opinion and shove it. We were shown when the Dixie Chicks were scrubbed from the radio what a politically minded CEO can do, so I choose to shut them up instead of them shutting up others. They had the right, they owned the stations as I was told so many times but I have the right to let CEO's know that their stances due carry consequences. The reason I will not shop there anymore is due to an idiot CEO that decided to pipe up, its a personal problem I have with our current culture, not because of his ideas which I may disagree with but really do not care about either.

    Sorry I went a bit ranty there Polimom, its not at you but just more of an explanation of my feelings on the topic.

  • Lit3Bolt

    Agreed TMSF. No one held a gun at Mackay's head to force him to get involved in a explosive political debate. If nothing else, I would hope that conservatives could agree that was a stupid decision from a business perspective. But no, it's time for the “If liberals hate it, I'm for it!” show. So hey, conservatives, psssssst, I hate terrorists! I really really hate terrorists. In fact, I boycott them. =)

  • sandymchoots

    Lit3Bolt:

    Thanks for replying in a moderate voice. We could make much progress on the health-care issues if more of us would stop ranting and start talking. Now I'd like to respond in kind with some points for you to consider.

    First of all, I agree that it is undesirable to have medical insurance tied so closely to one's job. Did you know that this started to become standard practice as a response to the combination of wage-price controls and the income-tax exemption for medical benefits? Of course, we have to initiate reform from our current position, so the basic question is how best to unlink health insurance from employment. Your preferred position appears to be a single-payer system. Others, such as John Mackey, prefer a system that enables individuals to shop for health insurance in a way that will give them access to care that is more similar to the easy access you rightly note that they have to food and shelter. I personally prefer a hybrid system, in which the non-poor are allowed to shop for the type of health insurance they want while the poor are offered a safety-net level of medical care. While I am fully in favor of a safety net, I do not find it useful to construe it as a “right,” which in its plain meaning is a limitation of the claims of the state against the individual.

    Couched in terms of “rights,” health care provision is unavoidably contentious, because it is hard to imagine how medical care that is a “right” cannot ultimately be provided only at a uniform standard at a negligible price. Many of us fear that such a system will ultimately deny us the right to purchase as much health care as we want to buy. There is ample evidence that this fear is well founded. We also worry very much about the future pace of medical innovation when the government is in charge. Proponents of the current House bill do nothing to assuage those fears by arguing “Shut up” in response.

    I applaud John Mackey for trying to open up a debate that has been made contentious by the repeated attempts to stifle it. If he is wrong, then this site, among others, offers a ready forum for explaining why he is wrong. Indeed, if he is so clearly wrong that you think he's an “idiot” then it ought to be very simple for you to explain the flaws in his proposals. When, instead, the immediate reaction is to try to silence him via a boycott, then it doesn't appear that there are very good replies to him that are readily at hand.

  • racetoinfinity

    “insight” is right – now we know what a “free market” b.s. corporatist Mackey is.

  • Silhouette

    “Dude” writes,
    “Liberals are just funny, reasoned debate is a cause for boycott!?? Way to go girls…

    I'm not much of a whole foods shopper myself, but I'll be sure to go there this weekend and let the folks there know that I'm ONLY there because of a man who is willing to speak his mind. “
    ************
    *rolls on floor, laughs ass off*…LOL…

    There's more than one way to skin a cat…lol…”dude” we'll have you eatin' tofu and organic veggies just to spite us. Spread the word. And when your meat 'n' 'taters buddies finally get weaned over to alfalfa sprouts with sesame' tahini dressing, call and let us know when the feast is on the table..lol..

    Meanwhile I'll shop at a cheaper outlet who doesn't support MedMob. You guys go out and spend yourselves stupid. Pass the hummus…

    *giggle*

  • StockBoySF

    AR, perfect reply! :) I wanted a reason to do a long comment on shopping choices and you fell for my trap. ;)

    Well, yes- quality and variety. I think that's why most people who shop at Whole Foods are looking for. But Whole Foods markets to those who want to “shop with a conscience”, which is another way to justify their high prices and make many people actually feel good about parting with their money.

    There are many areas where Whole Foods is the only game in town and I suspect that anyone who chooses to “boycott” the stores in these areas will eventually (within a couple weeks) return for the quality and variety. These are the reasons my mom shops at Whole Foods and I don't think she gives a whit about their political/social philosophy. And she won't boycott them.

    I won't boycott them either since I shop at other places just as expensive here in San Francisco…. :) I shop at other places solely for their convenience.

    If I did shop at WFMI I probably would not boycott them.

    At least I do have a choice in SF to shop elsewhere if it actually was an issue for me.

    After reading Mackey's piece I was actually more shocked at his employees' health insurance plan and the $2,500 deductible. I can't be entirely sure but I think it's a “doughnut hole”…. with the first $1,800 in expenses being covered through the company's contributions, then the next $2,500 shelled out by the employee, then coverage (whatever that includes) after that. Unless those cashiers and baggers are earning a really good salary, that $2,500 would be hard for many young people to come up with if needed all at once. And these are hourly employees so if they're in an accident and away from work then they would not actually be earning money to help cover the $2,500. No wonder WFMI pays for 100% of the premiums…. that plan is cheap enough for the company to be able to afford them.

    I shouldn't knock it too much…. If you only go to the doctor a couple times a year and have a few medications to take (which are probably fully covered up to $1,800/yr) it's excellent.

  • twannamaker

    Althouse has a very good read on this TMV guest opinion. I would suggest reading it http://is.gd/2iARY. It's pretty clear TMV wasn't thinking about its moderate base when they decided to let this rant be posted under their banner.

    And TMV Editor … I read your Editor's Note, and update, and footnote, etc. Stop digging the hole, just gets deeper. You screwed up letting a known ranter post a graceless screed, and recommend a Whole Foods boycott on the TMV site. No amount of words is going to cover your dumb move.

  • mnmark

    SeattleLefty wrote:
    >i> live in Seattle, and Whole Foods is opening a store about a a mile and a half from my house. Good luck getting me in the place! Let me explain in words that a wingnut free marketeer like John Mackey can understand: John, it's my money. I get to spend it, or not spend it, wherever and however I choose. It is entirely my decision, and you have utterly no say in the matter.

    How ironic. The “lefty” who wants government to take over health care – who wants our tax money to be spent on other people's health care whether we like it or not – is righteously proclaiming that he will spend his money where and how he wants and Mackey can't do a thing about it. I guess the freedom to spend your money the way you want only applies to left wingers. The rest of us will have the privilege of being taxed to pay for their pet causes. It's so hypocritical that it's hilarious. What an idiot.

  • arnkk

    Just left a Whole Foods store. No sign of fewer people or boycott. This store does not cater to “Che tee shirt” crowd. A little little more upscale and educated.

  • LionAslan

    hey twanna-be… no amount of words is going to cover that you're no moderate, and are anti-Obama. You have no interest in the topic here on Whole Foods. In fact, you comment is clearly off topic. Whatever. Your fake 'concern' about 'moderate base', only digs your own hole deeper. Gracelessly, as you say. Dumbly, as you say. Your other words elsewhere about your true political stance speak for themselves. The post here is written by Richard Blair. Free press and all, yanno. Or maybe you dont. Whatever.

  • http://polimom.com Polimom

    “Unless those cashiers and baggers are earning a really good salary, that $2,500 would be hard for many young people to come up with if needed all at once. And these are hourly employees so if they're in an accident and away from work then they would not actually be earning money to help cover the $2,500. No wonder WFMI pays for 100% of the premiums…. that plan is cheap enough for the company to be able to afford them.”

    Funny how differently we see that policy, StockBoy. When I read it I thought — what an excellent plan, all the way around. The employees are paying $0 premiums, so they can save what would otherwise be spent on monthly premiums, and use it on doctor's visits or whatever (at negotiated insurance rates). If they have no major catastrophes, they've not had to pay the premiums still, and come out way ahead. If they do have a major catastrophe, their out of pocket is off-set by the $ they've not had to spend (again) on premiums.

  • plumpplumberbalding

    Well, I shop at WF in Dallas when I'm in town. Great products. However, if a person wears their politics on their sleeves, then go and don't return. I'm a centrist libertarian, btw, and I really don't expect you to believe what I believe. However, if you're selling hand made goat cheese, well, I'm your man. And I hope that you can support your family selling cheese. I don't care about your politics, because that's what America is all about. IMHO, this is a tempest in a teapot, because WF fills a niche that I'm willing to pay for. Pecan smoked trout…..but I digress. More types of blue cheese than I can name, fresh figs, oh well…..so, free country and all, I'm comfortable enough in my own skin to let others do as they wish as long as no harm comes to my family.

  • drbill15

    I've got a feeling we're on different sides of this issue but I did get a laugh out of your comment.

  • section9

    The Moderate Voice, under complete and total pwnership by Ann Althouse for acts of complete asshatery unbecoming of a “moderate” blog. Jesus, not only are you obsequious Obamist bootlickers over here, you do boycotts when someone disagrees with the Agenda of teh Won!

  • D. E.Rodriguez

    Perhaps the earliest evidence as to how effective recent boycotts are, will come with Fox's Glenn Beck “show.”

    I understand that several powerful advertisers have pulled/are pulling their ads.

    Two things could happen: Fox could continue to absorb the losses and keep the show for a while, or advertisers from the Right could jump in and try to sfill the $$$vacuum and salvage that show.

    We'll see…

  • perfgeek

    seattlelefty wrote

    “Let me explain in words that a wingnut free marketeer like John Mackey can understand: John, it's my money. I get to spend it, or not spend it, wherever and however I choose. It is entirely my decision, and you have utterly no say in the matter. I am the (potential) customer. You are here to please me. Period, end of paragraph, end of story.”

    Yet this health care reform, the WF CEO's opposition to which has you in a lather is going to be taking your money and spending it wherever and however the government chooses. Indeed, you are completely at liberty to spend your money wherever and however you choose, even, if you wish, to fund healthcare for someone else. If you choose to not pay your taxes – either because you don't want the money going down a rathole in Iraq or because you don't want it funding healthcare for someone who decided to drop-out of high school – you end-up in the super-economy section of Club Fed.

  • michaelhaz

    That settles it. I'm going to increase the amount of my grocery budget that gets spent at WF.

    By the way, will some one please explain, point by point, what was objectionable about the WF CEOs op-ed piece? It seemed to make a hell of a lot of sense.

  • Silhouette

    Isn't it funny how all of a sudden a bunch of people are backing an obscure health food chain on TMV. This article has of my count some 69 replies when way way important issues like war, poverty and our debt barely get a dozen. Weird.

    And most of the posters above have never posted here before. Also Weird. Why would they choose TMV to post at on this one issue?

    Meanwhile one of the bots writes,

    ****
    “Just left a Whole Foods store. No sign of fewer people or boycott”
    *****

    If I believed you, which I don't, I would tell you that these things take time. People are networking on it as we debate it here. Word spreads slowly at first and then it takes on momentum. It all depends on the size of the fire behind the anger. All we have to do is remember a dear friend or a relative who lost everything they had or even died at the hands of MedMob's profiteering and voila! We have a spark and ignition…not like there's a lack of fuel for that fire…

    You can thank yourselves for creating the dry conditions perfect for this forest fire MedMob [and outspoken associates].

    [Remember Whole Foods, the flea jumps OFF the dying dog, not onto it.]

  • http://polimom.com Polimom

    Sil — some (though not all) of the recent commenters have come a-scurrying because another blogger (with a regrettable, but fairly obvious, reading comprehension disability) has linked here and attacked Joe Gandelman. A few of her followers have dutifully chimed in (possibly as part of a reading (in)comprehension support group exercise?). It seems that the words “guest” and “voice”, in combination and on a moderate site, have utterly confounded them.

    As to your comment: “This article has of my count some 69 replies when way way important issues like war, poverty and our debt barely get a dozen. Weird.”

    Surely you're kidding. I cannot believe the connection between the health care issue and the entire gamut of other issues escapes you.

    And fwiw — I expect WF will be just fine. I'm not so sure, though, about the staunchest supporters of nationalized care, when the public option is not in the final bill.

  • Lit3Bolt

    This Huffington Post article rebuts Mackay's Op-Ed point by point. He actually likes one of them (I like 2) but the dismay comes from the whole tone of the article itself. Feel free to actually read it.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ellis-weiner/half

    Again, the things he proposes are fantasyland ideas. He ends his op-ed in a disingenuous appeal to shop at Whole Foods to live a long and happy life (hint hint). It's ridiculous and the backlash is just as harsh as it was with the Dixie Chicks or Dunkin' Donuts. Business and politics shouldn't mix–when they do, constituents are free to vote with their dollars for or against the fool who just alienated half the country.

  • seattlelefty

    “A question for liberals, Why the hell should a company CEO's personal beliefs compel someone to not shop there? … If he said something like, “Death to Jews” or something I could understand the anger”

    Obviously, you are willing to penalize a CEO's personal beliefs too. Why?

    “If you were willing to pay more money for overpriced food in the first place, (something I never understood seeing as I've bought all my food from Wal-Mart and Western Beef when I lived in New York City) how do his personal views affect the quality of the product at all, which is all that matters in a business.”

    Hey wingnut, it's my money. I get to spend it, or not spend it, how and when and where I want to. I don't have to justify it to you or to Whole Foods. You wingnuts are forever talking about those sorts of individual rights. Isn't it interesting to watch you get your knickers in such a twist when someone chooses to exercise them in a way that displeases you!

    A business exists to satisfy consumer needs. Many of those needs are directly related to product quality, but many of them are not. Whole Foods sells more than organic foods. It sells a way of thinking, or implies that it does. Now that I know its CEO is a far-right wing jerk, I can — and will — choose to satisfy my desire for organic products, and the way of thinking that often goes with them, at other establishments.

    Here in Seattle, we have a wide range of choices for that sort of food, and for that way of thinking. John Mackey and his company are WILDLY out of step with me, and I think with my community. I predict that Whole Foods is going to fall flat on its Republican ass in Seattle. Yes, I know it will hurt your tender heart, and perhaps the value of the stock options that Mackey is taking in lieu of salary. That's the way the organic cookie crumbles.

    Welcome to the free market. That particular door happens to swing both ways. I have the sovereign right to spend my money as I see fit. If you don't like it, too bad. See if I care.

  • soupsoupsoup

    For those of you who are participating in this boycott, I suggest the following;

    Find a normal, moderate person. Tell them, “I refuse to shop at Whole Foods because their CEO wrote a single article in a newspaper which suggested alternatives to the current proposed healthcare plan. Further, I advise you to do the same.”

    See if they don't laugh you out of the room for being such a self important, small minded buffoon. If they don't, it's only because they are being polite.

    I am amazed that the same folks who claim that the right is offering no alternatives to Obama's plan are throwing a colossal tantrum at an article which makes a serious effort at proposing a workable alternative. It's time for those people calling for a boycott to stop calling themselves “progressives,” the more accurate term is “apparatchik.”

  • Silhouette

    Really!

  • Lit3Bolt

    sandy:

    John Mackey is not a hero and does not deserve your applause. His disdain for the Democrats and Obama is obvious from his opening quote by Margaret Thatcher. Some of his proposals are good (I liked 2), and some are completely goofy. He does not detail how to do any of his proposals, making them useless. He then goes on a screed that healthcare is not a right and implicitly implies that our healthcare is superior than other First World nations, to which I disagree. He then blithely suggests that eating plenty of fruits and veggies can cure all ills such as obesity, diabetes, etc. It can but only if the price of McDonald's goes up 5000%. (And the dietary habits of this country, which form a basis for a large part our ill health, is another topic entirely I believe.)

    I understand where you're coming from and I know what you mean when you say healthcare isn't a right. It's like saying a job is a right or a TV is a right or winning the lottery is a right. But at the same time people are suffering without care due to a broken system that is unable or unwilling to provide that care. We don't need a system of employee mandated insurance while the self-employed or above poverty line poor are forced to wait for free clinics to treat them akin to peasants in a Third World nation. The fire department doesn't wait to see if you're employed before turning the water on and police and EMTs rescue people regardless of status, employment and insurance from accidents. That by itself is an acknowledgment to basic care to human decency and suffering. Many many other nations treat healthcare as a right and pay much less than we do for it.

    So we can agree to disagree but let's acknowledge slippery slopes can go both ways. Only the government, sadly, can provide the kind of intervention in the system we need because the industry is unwilling or unable to do so.

  • Lit3Bolt

    Did you actually read the article? Do you really call those 8 proposals a “serious effort?”

    Plus your hollow disdain for the liberal response is only a knee-jerk reaction of your own. Pot meet kettle. It's just amusing to watch all the tough guy conservatives reach for their smelling salts and clutch at their pearls as they fret over the fate of poor ol' John Mackay.

  • StockBoySF

    Polimon, “Funny how differently we see that policy, StockBoy.”

    Sure, if the employees actually were making a good wage they might be able to save $2,500/year.

    According to Mackey in his piece, “We also provide up to $1,800 per year in additional health-care dollars through deposits into employees’ Personal Wellness Accounts to spend as they choose on their own health and wellness.”

    And then…..

    “Our team members therefore spend their own health-care dollars until the annual deductible is covered (about $2,500) and the insurance plan kicks in.”

    I just looked at the benefits section on their website. The $1,800 which Mackey writes about in his piece is (according to the website) between $300 and $1,800 based on years of service.

    The bit about the employees spending money in their Personal Wellness Accounts as they choose…. the website says the benefits will cover “allowable healthcare expenses”. I'd be interested to know what those “allowable healthcare expenses” cover. Do they cover the cost of gym memberships which can lower blood pressure and maintain weight at a healthy level?

    No, I'm not proposing the government cover gym memberships in their healthcare plan. I am making the point that each person's wellness and health program is different. While some people may use their benefit money on doctors' visits, others may want to go to the gym to remain healthy.

    I think it's a good plan if one's insurance needs are minimal but potentially painful on the salaries of the people in that line of work.

    http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/careers/benefit

  • http://polimom.com Polimom

    “I think it's a good plan if one's insurance needs are minimal but potentially painful on the salaries of the people in that line of work.”

    Stockboy, those employees receive other benefits as well. Like stock options. Which are unlikely to be as helpful to those folks given the overreaction by the boycotters. (which takes us full circle to where this thread started.)

  • StockBoySF

    “A question for liberals, Why the hell should a company CEO's personal beliefs compel someone to not shop there? … If he said something like, “Death to Jews” or something I could understand the anger”

    He may not have said, “Death to Jews” but he is supporting a position that some people do not want to support even indirectly (he did market to a certain group of people interested in matters such as this). Because he is a founder, CEO and chairman, any money that a customer spends does benefit him professionally and personally.

    If you were a McCain supporter last year, but liked the design of Obama's T-shirts would you buy one? Probably not because you wouldn't want to support Obama. So the people who are boycotting WFM feel the same way.

    I think most of the boycotters believe in Mackey's right to say what he wants, but they also have a right to support businesses that share their values.

  • CStanley

    Stockboy- compare what those employees are getting now vs. what they would have with a public option health insurance plan, and I'll bet they're better off now. Basically, even the employees that get only $300 in their account have to meet a deductible of $2200, over the course of a year, before their insurance benefits kick in. That's less than $200 a month. Is the public option premium going to be less than that? I doubt it.

    Are gym memberships covered? Probably not, but vitamins and supplements are- and those employees may be getting a store discount as well (I don't know that for certain but it's a pretty common perk to give employee discounts.) And more importantly- are gym memberships covered by any health plan, including the proposed public option? Again, I'm pretty sure the answer is no.

    And the slightly less than $200 a month? That's only if they actually incur medical expenses. A lot of young, healthy people will spend far less than that over the course of the year, but by having a high deductible health plan in place, these folks are better off than their peers who choose not to get insurance at all, becuase they're covered in the event of a serious health problem or traumatic injury occurring.

    And remember, that example was for the workers of that company who are on the bottom of the totem pole, while others are getting a lot more than the $300 in their account and some only have to meet a $700 deductible out of their own pocket before their benefits kick in.

    As for the people saying that his proposals aren't real world or aren't workable- what a strange criticism, considering that he's basing it on a system that he himself has implemented in his corporation which obviously IS working, and he's making policy recommendations for things that would help facilitate other businesses doing the same.

  • pacatrue

    How did a guest post about Whole Foods become one of the most controversial posts on the site in two weeks?

  • CStanley

    It is bizarre, isn't it, paca? I find it amazing that people are this worked up about it. I think people do have the right to boycott if that's how they feel, but I find their feelings on the matter pretty puzzling. It's not as though he wrote an anti-Obama screed, or wrote over the top nonsense about death panels or whatever rhetoric people on the left might rightfully object to. He wrote about his own opinions on health care reform based on his real life experience of providing health care for the large number of employees of his stores. I thought liberals were enraged by corporations that jump through hoops to avoid paying for healthcare for their employees? Here's a guy who figured out a way to get it done because he apparently feels an obligation to do so- but apparently because it undercuts their message that there's a crisis that can only be resolved by expanding the government's role in providing public health insurance, some people feel the need to heap scorn on him. That's my take on it, anyway. It's not that people don't have the right to that opinion, or to sending a message to him in response by refusing to shop there- but my opinion is that that's a response that is completely out of proportion to his stance and his rhetoric and rationale.

    And yes, I do think that a lot of the conservative boycotts have also been way out of proportion, including the Dunkin Donuts one that's been mentioned here. I personally don't even favor boycotts at all in most situations, but in some extreme cases I might consider it.

  • CStanley

    If you were a McCain supporter last year, but liked the design of Obama's T-shirts would you buy one? Probably not because you wouldn't want to support Obama. So the people who are boycotting WFM feel the same way.

    That's not even remotely similar unless you do believe that people shop at Whole Foods only to support a particular political agenda. As a lot of people here have pointed out, the overall clientele at WF is probably not nearly as liberal/progressive as the liberal/progressive crowd seems to think it is. A lot of us shop there for the products, not the image or lifestyle connotations.

  • http://polimom.com Polimom

    “I thought liberals were enraged by corporations that jump through hoops to avoid paying for healthcare for their employees? “

    I think there's some disharmony there already because WF is non-union.

  • frabert

    I agree get rid of those just say no Republican kooks lunatics and please lets kill grandma

  • frabert

    Right on Stanley and pass the cheetos

  • CStanley

    PM- Probably correct, but that's just one more data point IMO showing that some on the left are more concerned with orthodoxical political ideas than with outcomes that work for people. If a nonunion establishment treats its employees well so that they don't need collective bargaining power, why should that be a problem?

  • http://twitter.com/rasqual rasqual

    “more importantly I have a free wallet.”

    At least until Washington starts running our health care.

  • http://twitter.com/rasqual rasqual

    “Why not hurt him financially if you can?”

    Damage to Whole Foods would hurt many people far lower in the company's compensation range before it hurt him.

    Folks who support Obamacare generally claim to care about people, then they turn around and advocate actions that would damage people — for no better reason that that they hate one person so much they'll scapegoat a whole company.

    It's pretty pathetic.

  • http://twitter.com/rasqual rasqual

    “So if you get sick, it's YOUR fault because you had that 3rd helping of ice cream when you were 5 years old, “

    Actually, no. You're dramatically understanding the wold howling at America's health door — insane obesity that's the consequence of people behaving irresponsibly.

    What's insane is that you're holding the man in such contempt that you reflexively attack a paragraph that's utterly uncontroversial and entirely wise. If you had encountered a similar paragraph in an anonymous brochure concerned with health and nutrition, you'd have nodded assent, wondering why the author would take pains to express something that should be obvious to everyone.

    Weird.

  • archangel

    if you would like to read Mr. Mackey's unedited pre-WSJ letter, it is here at TMV. http://themoderatevoice.com/43214/what-john-mac

  • lilybart1

    I'm a libertarian and shop at Whole Foods. I think I'll make extra trips to the store to make up for these silly people.

    What is not 'wholesome' is trying to shut off people's ability to debate and offer alternatives options.

    What is not 'wholesome' is supporting reckless, poorly conceived legislation.

  • http://twitter.com/rasqual rasqual

    “If I believed you, which I don't,”

    So when the boycott dries up and blows away like the dumb idea it was, I'm wondering how long the boycotters will take before regret sinks in — regret at having committed with such zeal and ardour, here, to something that nets no result they confidently imagine it will gain for their cause.

    Will integrity keep them out of Whole Foods, or will “oh well, it didn't work so I might as well go back and shop there” be the lame-ass evidence for the lame-ass thinking that led them to this lame-ass attitude and lame-ass action in the first place?

  • plumpplumberbalding

    Most of the progressive leftists I have known – the dedicated ones – (1) didn't have the money to shop there, or (2) would have felt that it was way too bushwah. Just sayin'……The folks who shop there and can actually afford it where I live ain't necessarily leftist. Now, granted they may profess such beliefs, but they ain't serious old school.

    In a free society, it's pretty rough and tumble. The idea of trying to destroy WF for dissenting opinion is daft, to say the least. By the way, I came here via Memeorandum, attracted by the topic of the WF argument.

  • stevenkalka

    How come when the shoe is on the other foot, we don't stop hearing about it? You'll have endless movies and plays, lives ruined and careers ended because of unfair blacklists against leftists. I guess it depends on whose ox is being gored.
    Once in a while and have dinner at Whole Foods, and will continue to do so. I disagree with the House health care reform pushed by Obama.

  • redrockraven

    My wife and I have been shopping regularly at Whole Foods in Las Vegas for over 10 years. We sincerely thank the business CEO for providing his view of the health care issues facing the US. Since Mr. Mackey's views appear to be a direct contradiction to the healthy living ideals that we have until now believed that their stores promote, my wife and I will be taking our business to another store.

    We do not intend to continue to support a hypocritical business that believes more in lining their own pockets and shortchanging their employees health plans than in promoting the health and welfare of their customers and employees.

  • tktcali

    It's amazing how much a person can spend in Whole Foods in a single visit. I am more than willing to donate what I save to health care reform.

  • brookspotteiger

    It's terrifying how ignorant people are.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Matthew-Fladell/1069994441 Matthew Fladell

    Dear Charlie, Mr. Mackey used the Whole Foods name and his position as CEO to promote his so-called “personal opinions”. While technically they are not the opinions of Whole Foods Markets, Inc., the identification between founder/major shareholder Mackey and WF is too close for comfort. It's not like he offered personal opinions at a private function which were overheard and published. He sought out a very public, right leaning forum, and savaged President Obama's health care reform plan in the nicest most high minded possible way of course. Apparently a large portion of the “Wheat Grass Roots” takes exception. After all WE are the customers who made Mackey rich and gave him the platform he used to denigrate a political initiative many of us are passionate about. “Liberals” are not intolerant of different ideas. But we're not gonna finance the other guy's campaign. And we'll do what it takes to turn Whole Foods around so the pro-social holistic community oriented profile it projects on the floor of the stores also is real in the executive suite and the on board of directors. Want Whole Foods to be what you thought is was? BUY STOCK NASDAQ: WFMI Then exercise your rights as an owner.

  • seattlelefty

    So when the boycott dries up and blows away like the dumb idea it was, I'm wondering how long the boycotters will take before regret sinks in — regret at having committed with such zeal and ardour, here, to something that nets no result they confidently imagine it will gain for their cause.

    Do yourself a favor, and check in a couple of years to see how Whole Foods is doing in Seattle. They might manage to b.s. people elsewhere in the country, but they are going to lay an organic, platinum-plated egg in this town.

  • davend

    He still has outstanding stock options that have already been granted to him–even if he's not taking new ones. If WF's stock price drops as a result of this, it will cost Mackey a lot, actually. His salary (which was was previously capped by company policy anyway) has always been paltry compared to his options.

  • davend

    “Are gym memberships covered? Probably not, but vitamins and supplements are- and those employees may be getting a store discount as well (I don't know that for certain but it's a pretty common perk to give employee discounts.)”

    Having worked in the industry, I can virtually guarantee that the WF employees don't get any discounts on their groceries.

  • CStanley

    Davend, having thought about it I think you're most likely correct about discounts, but that was only a small side point to my main comment about comparing the Whole Foods' employees current health plan to what they would have as an option if the public option reform plan gets passed.

  • doug1117

    I have not been to this website in about 6 months. Before that, I would randomly post one-line in comments in many articles that said “This is not a moderate voice” I'm back today after reading an Althouse critique of the moderate voice to back her opinion up. This website is not moderate.

  • kwf

    Amazing. Suggest you look up the word boycott in the dictionary, clueless one.

  • Budahmon

    “Whole Foods is going to have an entirely new demographic shopping in their stores. The only problem is: last I checked, Whole Foods doesn’t stock Coke, Cheetos, Armor hotdogs, or 365-brand Instant Grits.”

    As a Conservative Mobster…..We shop at Whole Foods twice a week to get soy free products…and have been shopping there since they opened the store. Many of the people I see there are conservatives judging by bumper stickers. The other local health store in my area is owned by a very active Republican. I guess I'll have to go three times a week now to show my support….

  • jackmackenzie

    The health care reform bills working through the Democratic controlled House and Senate and what this Administration have clearly signaled is that reform is intended specifically to restrict choices and that you and I do not have the right to exercise our power of Free Choice and Free Association. These bills are clearly authored to end up a single payer system, meaning …. socialized medicine.

    I am appalled any progressive or liberal can stand for such. Progressives and liberals are the very essence of Question Authority, yet here these ideologies are, lining up to fiercely defend The State in stamping out this most personal of choices, how you care for yourself.

    This is boggling on the face of it. Liberals and progressives curse and fight and strain against any commandment to corral personal behavior but are working as hard as can be to ensure The State has complete control over every aspect of their health. The contradiction isn't just alarming, but frightening.

    If you think you can trust the government …

    Ask an Indian
    Remember all our modern past Presidents
    WMDs in Iraq
    Artificial sweeteners are safe

    … I mean, really, how long a list do you need before you realize that you've always been right that The State Cannot Be Trusted?

    The State Cannot Be Trusted.

    Why are you lobbying to give away your right to care for yourself the way you see fit? Why are you lobbying to coerce me into giving up my rights?

  • wildmonk

    But SeattleLefty – this comment makes it obvious to me that you still have a long way to go to achieve a true progressive consciousness. In many ways, you seem quite backward-thinking to me. Seriously, why are you still thinking in terms of “your” money and spending it the way you see fit? For the good of the collective, you should spend only as the collective dictates. Why have you been indulging in WF foods when you could have spent the 20% premium paid there on feeding those less fortunate than you?

    Obviously, your commitment to public financing of medical care is only good “in theory” and plays no real role in raising your consciousness. And what is this piffle about “the free flow of information is critical to the functioning of free markets”?? You MUST avoid such reactionary expressions out of a reasonable caution that you might lead the unwashed to question why Obama must suppress the free flow of information/money in medicine for the good of society.

  • http://polimom.com Polimom

    wildmonk, you seem to be confusing socialism with communism.

  • m1shu

    John, it's my money. I get to spend it, or not spend it, wherever and however I choose. It is entirely my decision, and you have utterly no say in the matter. I am the (potential) customer. You are here to please me. Period, end of paragraph, end of story.

    Are you trying to be ironic on purpose?

  • m1shu

    Oddball thing is, I also have free speech, and more importantly I have a free wallet.

    This is even funnier. Somehow you have blinders to this concept when it comes to the medical industry.

  • mrpundit

    “Welcome to the free market. That particular door happens to swing both ways. I have the sovereign right to spend my money as I see fit. If you don't like it, too bad. See if I care.”

    Oooooh … another leftwinger that claims to support the free market. Fine, and I choose NOT to spend MY money on Obama's idiotic health care overhaul. If you don't like it, “too bad”.

  • Lit3Bolt

    And corporations can be trusted?

  • arbought

    I have not read Mackey's remarks in the WFS but he was able to do so when my thoughts on the health care issue would be summarily dismissed by that corporate paper be I be for it or not. I have spent three hours reading comments on wether or not to boycot some store that I have never heard about.

    I thought the issue was about health insurance, pros and cons. Does any one really know what Obama's health care plans are all about? I don't but I sure would like to know. I hear more controversial talk about how bad it is and how good it will be yet I have not heard much about any solid offerings about what is actually to be offered in this package. What is the issue here, the boycott or the insurance package–pro and con?

  • politicjock

    I used to spend an average of $200 a week (or, about $10,000 a year) at Whole Foods. This week, after reading Whole Foods CEO John Mackey's op-ed in the Wall Street Journal I've decided to no longer shop at Whole Foods unless Mackey reverses his opposition to Obama's health care reform or the Whole Foods board replaces him. I am shopping at Trader Joe's instead.

  • DirkL

    If you really think free choice is so great, then why do you support a public option that will crowd out individual choice? If the supermarkets were run by the government, you wouldn't have the choice to boycott like you do Whole Foods.

  • G4DSD3N

    If you boycott Whole Foods because its CEO offered his opinion (which isn't necessarily the opinion of the company) on an issue of the day, you're either incapable or unwilling to differentiate the personal from the political and vice versa. If incapable, then you're just an ignorant moron; if unwilling, then you fall squarely within the category of the cancer that is destroying American political discourse. Not to mention the fact that his prescriptions would actually help, whereas more government involvement in health care would do to it what more government involvement does to anything (hint: it doesn't make it better or more efficient).

  • plumpplumberbalding

    Wildmonk, I bow in your general direction. Polimom, socialism is communism light. When I was but a wee lad, I found myself dwelling among a goodly number of “enlightened” socialists in Northern New Mexico in the late '60s and early '70s. the folks I most respected were the ones who actually went out and lived the socialist life of trying to help the extreme poverty that existed in the rural parts of Northern New Mexico. However, there was a different breed that came from the eastern universities that kept on a sayin' power to the people, but don't bogart that joint. They surely had their little red books, but the curious thing was they were being supported by moma and daddy. You know, other peoples money. Still, just being a lad among hippies, I figured out right quick that if they were actually in China, the BEST they could hope for was severe class criticism, at the very least. I learned an obvious truth back then, and it goes something like this – Serious leftists never have any money….They ain't geared that way…..helping folks in clinics and such ain't a revenue generator. So, when I hear all this noise about leftists boycotting Whole Foods, oh please……..leftist dilletantes, I reckon, and as any student of human nature will tell you, these are the folks who make the most noise, and get the most upset, because the fact of the matter is, the people who are trying to help ain't got time for this silly shit, and it's for sure that the idea of spending so much money for food is ridiculous. Personally, Walmart is great, and Whole foods for a special treat.

  • seattlelefty

    For the good of the collective, you should spend only as the collective dictates.

    I'm just a leftie, not a communist like you. Sorry.

    You MUST avoid such reactionary expressions out of a reasonable caution

    I also believe in freedom of speech, unlike wingnuts.

    I choose NOT to spend MY money on Obama's idiotic health care overhaul. If you don't like it, “too bad”.

    I don't care what you do, as long as you pay your taxes.

    Does any one really know what Obama's health care plans are all about? I don't but I sure would like to know

    The details have been all over the newspapers. It would seem that you are too lazy to do your research. Welcome to America. No wonder we had eight years of George W. Bush. A lazy population tends to get the leadership it deserves.

    If you really think free choice is so great, then why do you support a public option that will crowd out individual choice?

    I would go further. I would support a gradual expansion of the VA, which is operated cradle to grave by the federal government, and which has demonstrated outcomes better than average, and demonstrated costs lower than average. If it “crowded out” the private system, it would be because the health insurance “industry” adds absolutely nothing to the system.

  • Charlie

    Progressives are in shock that Obamacare is going nowhere. They can't bring themselves to blame Obama even though it was his ineptness in selling the plan that has doomed it. So along comes a presumed fellow traveler in Mackey spouting libertarian alternatives, and he gets the full brunt of their wrath… for the crime of apostasy. Ho hum.

    I've patronized Whole Foods all over the country, but where I live now, the closest is a 45-minute drive. There's a wannabe store only 25 minutes away, and I usually settle for that option. But no more. It's worth the extra 40 minutes per trip to support a wholesome (not to mention brave) vision of our health future!

  • seattlelefty

    It's true that Obama's healthcare plan will go nowhere. The “Democrats” in the Senate are going to kill it. Which will leave Obama in the worst of all worlds. He'll have pushed through an inconsequential change that will do very little for anyone, yet it will be enough of a change for the Republicans and the media to be able to blame him for it.

    All that aside, I'm never going to set foot in the Republican Foods store when it opens a mile and a half from my house. I can do that much, and it'll be interesting to see how many other people do the same.

  • StockBoySF

    Polimom, “…those employees receive other benefits as well. Like stock options.”

    Yes, you're right. The WFM employees do have good benefits and I assume good pay given the high prices the company charges. I'm feeling argumentative, which isn't a space I want to be in so I won't argue. I also can't say anything about the stock options since I don't know the specifics, i.e. eligibility, how many shares are granted, the strike price, etc.

    But the bottom line is if the employees are happy then that's what counts. I'll just shut my mouth before I make more of a fool of myself than I have already.

  • zandylion

    Why make fun of grits in order to make a point? Last time I checked, progressive thought wasn't about stereotyping people who eat a certain food, especially one with a rich cultural heritage.

  • dan7000

    mrpundit: “Oooooh … another leftwinger that claims to support the free market. Fine, and I choose NOT to spend MY money on Obama's idiotic health care overhaul. If you don't like it, “too bad”.”

    I guess you'd rather spend an average of $4800 a year like you do now, instead of lowering the cost to closer to the $2500 per person that every intelligent country spends on public insurance. So you want to waste more money to get worse health care. Why should I care how you spend “your” money? Because I don't want you to bring me down with you. Personally, I'd rather go the less-expensive, more-effective route that every other country gets with a public option.

    Oh, and by the way, I assume you will pledge never to enroll in Medicare, since you're convinced that government insurance is so horrible??

  • mainstreethealth

    I think the 'outraged' who think that boycotting Whole Foods is a solution should also get Obama to open an alternative store for them that offers the same kind of service. Of course it couldn't survive without massive tax subsidies, and it would run about half as well as the post office.

    People are insane if they think that boycotting WF is going to impact Mackey. More importantly, it's going to affect hundreds of employees…most of whom are minorities in the WF stores in our area…employees that all have better benefits than I do with 100% coverage, employer subsidized HSA's…and I work in a hospital! Way to go…looks like you really thought that one through.

  • seattlelefty

    I think the 'outraged' who think that boycotting Whole Foods is a solution

    Who said it was a “boycott,” and even if it is, who says it's a “solution?” For me, it's just a matter of where to spend my money. I drive past the new Whole Foods store every day. Now when I look at it I will have a negative association, and I won't go there. I couldn't care less what happens to John Mackey. I'm sure he has his. Maybe he'll get cancer and die. Maybe he'll live until he's 120, and donate to wingnut causes. Whatever.

  • drbill15

    Take a good look at these town hall mobsters, Mackey better start stocking hot dogs, Kraft Mac & Cheese and Mountain Dew if he expects to pick up this crowd.

  • lilybart1

    “And corporations can be trusted?”

    Corporations don't have the full power of the state behind them. They cannot deprive you of your life and liberty. Government can use force on me.

    I can't understand why people can't see the difference here.

  • oldgreymare

    I spent a whopping $210 yesterday at Whole Foods. I thought I'd do my part.

  • AnnJo

    SeattleLefty and others who will never darken Whole Foods’ doorstep again, you may be in the running for a Darwin Award. If you refuse to buy food from anyone who disagrees with you, you won’t be with us for long.

    If you boycott Whole Foods because you don’t like its CEO’s position on ObamaCare, are you going to shop instead at Trader Joe’s, which is a subsidiary of a huge German discount grocery store chain privately owned by the 9th richest person in the world (according to the 2009 Forbes list) – and what do you bet he doesn’t rely on Germany’s universal health care system? Or are you going to shop at your local farmers’ markets and, if so, are you only going to shop with the farmers who take an oath that they support ObamaCare and have dropped their Grange membership? Or are you going to shop at Central Market, and if so, are you going to ask owner Larry Nakata if his opinion on health care reform is any different than McKey’s?

    PCC might be a safe place, except – what about how the food gets to the store? Are you aware that ALL of the products at any of these stores relied on the villainous oil companies to get there, and a huge market share of the food shipping industry is in the hands of staunch conservatives who donate generously to Republican candidates?

    Is your problem that the Whole Foods CEO disagrees with you, or that he rubbed it in your face that he disagrees with you by saying so out loud? After all, if you’ve been a frequent Whole Foods shopper before now, you must like the product he puts out. It must really bother your self-regard that someone who does something you like doesn’t share your whole mindset. It makes it harder to hold on to your bigotry – the cognitive dissonance that someone might share your admiration for organic foods and yet disagree with you on health care reform.

    The problem, SeattleLefty and others like you, is that you have mistakenly confused a public policy debate with a litmus test for good and evil. CEO McKey has a valuable perspective on health care from his own life and business experiences, and they have led him to a different conclusion than you reached. So debate his arguments, if you can, but don’t think that your views on health care policy somehow earn you sainthood and prove him a demon. In other words, grow up.

  • AnnJo

    You should check again. Progressive thought nowadays is ALL about stereotyping.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/David-Stewart/1292758011 David Stewart

    Yeah, I'll buycott Whole Foods! I'll be shopping there more. I already do. Mackey's article was pretty much everything I've believed should be done. So I'm glad to support him and more importantly his proposal. I think it's great of you to put up this page supporting him against people who want, instead, basically to communize health care.

    Oh, shit. That title says “BOYcott!”

    Oh. You really can't think straight, can you.

  • bhf2

    Just want you to know I didn't USED TO shop at Whole Foods – BUT I'M GOING TO START TODAY!!! YEAH. How come dissent was good under Bush, but discouraged if not prohibited by the left under Obama?

  • StockBoySF

    bhf2, “How come dissent was good under Bush, but discouraged if not prohibited by the left under Obama?”

    I don't understand…. Under Bush the conservatives went along with everything he said. Bush even marginalized anyone who disagreed with him and the conservatives were fine. Especially on the run up to the Iraq war. In case you've forgotten tens of millions of people all over the world protested what everyone viewed as Bush's inevitable invasion of Iraq, which was a war based on lies and choice. However the conservatives led by Bush essentially said, “You're either with us or against us.”

    So today… aren't those people who are boycotting WFM protesting (dissenting)? I don't see Obama either supporting or opposing the right of individuals to take their business elsewhere if they don't like something.

    So…. how is Obama discouraging dissent? More importantly, why did Bush not listen to the American people? Our country is worse off after eight years of Bush…. Are you calling for his return or a continuation of his ruinous policies?

    Just to be clear… lots of comments on here…. I don't shop at WFM and if I did I wouldn't stop because of this. I think the boycott is silly, but I understand why some people are upset and they are right (for their reasons- but what motivates them is different than what motivates me… and I'm sure what motivates you is an equally right third view).

  • seattlelefty

    SeattleLefty and others who will never darken Whole Foods’ doorstep again, you may be in the running for a Darwin Award. If you refuse to buy food from anyone who disagrees with you, you won’t be with us for long.

    Your concern touches my heart. If you love Wingnut Foods so much, then shop there. But I won't.

    After all, if you’ve been a frequent Whole Foods shopper before now, you must like the product he puts out.

    Wingnut, you people aren't big on reading comprehension, are you? I wrote that a new Wingnut Foods is opening a mile and a half from my house. Ordinarily, that would make the place a candidate for my business, because it's a bit closer to my house than some of their competition. But I'm not going to spend my money there.

    The problem, SeattleLefty and others like you, is that you have mistakenly confused a public policy debate with a litmus test for good and evil.

    So you say. But what you say has nothing to do with how I will act, or why. I'm not going to shop at Wingnut Foods because their CEO is an Republican jerk. Looks like you'll have to spend twice as much to make up for it, huh?

    CEO McKey has a valuable perspective on health care from his own life and business experiences

    CEO Mackey is a wingnut who wants to deny healthcare to Americans. His “perspective” isn't valuable, it's obnoxious. So I'm not going to darken his company's doorway. He's got a right to free speech, and I have a right to spend (or not spend) where I want to. Funny how you wingnuts are all for “the free market” until it turns on you. Hey, maybe Wingnut Foods can hire a lobbyist and get Republicans to support a subsidy.

    In other words, grow up.

    What makes you so apoplectic about my spending choices? Take your hand out of my wallet and run along, child!
    I don't think I'm the one who needs to grow up here, winger.

  • franky4770

    I believe anyone that joins a boycot based on the opinion of the opinion of the CEO are stupid. It totally contradicts what freedom in america is all about. This man has the right to speak his mind and people who disagree have the right not to shop there if they don't want to anymore. But to start a boycot over this,well it seems to me that the person who started this boycot is just seeking attention. Grow up america we don't live in a communist country and that is just the way we are going.

  • franky4770

    People who feel they need to boycott whole foods are stupid just plain stupid. What's next , if the CEO of ACME came out and said that he believes that abortion should be overturned and made illegal which it should be anyway then some stupid fool is going to start a boycott against ACME. It sounds like to me if liberals don't get there way then it's no way for anybody. That to all is communism. So what the CEO of Whole Foods doesn't back Obamas plan big deal just go on with your life. I don't back Obama's plan let see some stupid fool just try to boycott me. They won't be standind for to long.

  • seattlelefty

    It sounds like to me if liberals don't get there way then it's no way for anybody. That to all is communism.

    What is “communist” about spending my money the way I feel like spending it? Funny how wingnuts love the free market until it bites 'em. It's hilarious to see!

  • redstatetiger

    seattle lefty

    If you love health care so much, spend you're freaking money on it and not mine. What a idiot.

  • seattlelefty

    If you love health care so much, spend you're freaking money on it and not mine. What a idiot.

    I'll do as I please, including not shopping at Wingnut Foods.

  • paultshort

    I never shopped Whole Foods in my life until last week. Outside a store, I saw a bunch of wild people holding signs. A lot of women with mustaches and men with squeaky voices. I supposed it was some big promotion for a new store or something. So I figured there must be something good.

    Wow. I bought all kinds of cool stuff. And I didn’t need anything. I just bought stuff and gave it away to my family and friends. And the air conditioning in the store was great, nice and cold. After I finished my snacks, I just threw the wrappers out the window, which is pretty cool too.

    I am now hooked on Whole Foods.

    Thanks all for the campaign!

    BTW.

    Socialized government healthcare – to insure the 25 million illegal aliens in the US – would lead the US faster to ruin, which is what liberals want because they hate the US and its history.

    The polls prove it – most Americans don’t want government run health care.

    The people who want it had never heard of “health care” before until Al Gore invented it a few years ago. Or was that the Internet, I forget?

    I am a Democrat BTW.

  • AnnJo

    Could leftwingers please start boycotts against some of the companies I own stock in? Please? Seems to be doing good things for Whole Foods' stock price so far!