When a Famous Name Isn’t Enough To Wow Them In a Job

On my Twitter feed I often praise MSNBC’s Luke Russert, who has evolved into a superb reporter and an excellent anchor. He isn’t just coasting on his name. He has gotten opportunities due to it and he was ready for it. His late, great father must be smiling.

That isn’t always the case…

1 Comment

  1. Thanks Joe, I like Luke alot too. The article link goes to a screed using a very old picture of Chelsea Clinton (I wonder why?), and seems based on a profound number of unidentified sources in their piece. Luke Russert was personally and daily near and actively groomed by his father, was already up and coming when his dad suddenly up and died, and had already credits to his name. In the linked article I dont get why the journalist over there would think Chelsea who has no heavy mentor in the field of anchoring and reporting should be the butt of slamming just starting out. It also sounds like those ‘un-named sources’ in the piece are beyond catty about her interviews, maybe beyond jealous that they dont have at least ‘celebrity’ entry and sway. Makes the culture of the networks and cable news mentioned in the article look pretty grim and somewhere down in the gossip gutter instead of excellent reportage on their parts. Well trained people have the Advantage. Well known people have the Opportunity. Only time will tell which does better. Perhaps both. I tend to root for the young regardless just for training and trying… which is lifelong we soon all find out.

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