Democratic Left Political Death Wish Part IV

I’ve often written about or noted how Democratic Party liberals tend to go after their own Presidents in primaries, or stay home when they don’t like something their party does. Then they spend the next few years shocked about how the GOP seems to be taking over the courts more and more, seems to get a bigger foothold in controlling the Supreme Court, gets its members entrenched in the democracy and how Republican office holders on the national and state levels know how to use (some will say abuse) power when they get it — political power and the use of an office to dominate a narrative.

Is it about to happen again? It sounds that way.

Also, re-read this column.

         

7 Comments

  1. Mr Obama has forgotten who brought him to the dance.

    I’d rather have 40 committed Liberal Senators who will block Conservative idiocies than a Democratic President, House and Senate who will roll over the second a conservative says boo and who will suggest reducing entitlements while refusing to raise taxes or downsize the Military which is what we have had for the last couple of years.

  2. I love the campaign button designed by Taylor Marsh accompanying the linked article!

  3. First off, I know it’s tempting to imagine that Bernie Sanders is the leftward equivalent of the TP, but I don’t buy it.

    “I think it would be a good idea if President Obama faced some primary opposition.” – Sanders

    No problem with that sentiment from this quarter; I view it as very much in keeping with our democratic tradition. I think many of the people who voted for Obama expected considerably more constrast between him and his predecessor and would like an opportunity to express this. What better way than a primary? Just because the GOP has refined the lock-step doesn’t mean democrats need to follow a bad example. Maybe, just maybe, Americans will figure it all out one day. . . . . . . ;-)

  4. Don’t forget that Hillary Clinton had long thrown aside her far-left nonsense (responsible in large part for the 1994 election results).

  5. Sanders is farther left than the Tea Party is to the right. Only the few farther righties that emerged later in 2010 (not part of center-right US populism, but farther to the right) might compare with Sanders.

  6. Not a death wish, rather just the crazy way both parties look at things these days. The right hates it’s RINOs, the left hates it’s Blue Dogs, both failing to realize that without moderate elements they have no way to keep a majority. Many would rather lose with a party that agrees with them on everything than win with a party that agrees with them on most things.

  7. We see that most colorfully at the moment with the House Republicans Boehner has to try to get to accept some kind of budget deal.* (The Dems are as bad or worse, but the GOP is more colorful right now.) The House Republicans may reject any budget deal they don’t completely like. It’s plainly weird that they apparently would reject any tax reform that only consists of the end to many “loopholes” or other complications in the tax laws, because it could result in higher revenues. That’s just crazy.

    They’re misreading the 2010 vote (which was a No vote on the Democrats and lunging too far to the left and overreaching by Washington, not a Yes vote on the Republicans and whatever they variously claimed to promise Americans), though I believe it is a more complicated subject than that, because I’ve observed the GOP behavior in a number of (GOP-news-making) states as well as in Washington. (Note that these people, notably in the states, are social conservatives and religious conservatives, not the ordinary center-right populist “Tea Party” that has been so misdescribed.)

    * No budget scheme has ever been needed, of course; a straight vote only on the debt limit could be crafted, passed, and approved by the President in one day. Now the additional thing is: Would the House Republicans vote No on, and kill, debt-limit-only legislation?

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