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Posted by on Mar 27, 2007 in Politics | 14 comments

Romancing Fred Thompson

Unsatisfied with McCain, Giuliani, and Romney — although perhaps not Brownback — Republicans are searching desperately for a suitably conservative candidate to run in ’08.

Enter: Fred Thompson of Law & Order, Die Hard 2, and The Hunt for Red October.

The hardest of the hardcore love him. Consider what Powerline’s Paul Mirengoff has to say about the former Watergate lawyer and senator from Tennessee: “Thompson looks like the perfect blend of the Allen/Frist/Romney/Gingrich and McCain/Giuliani ‘factions.'”

I know that sounds like a terrible insult, but, well, not to conservatives.

Ring the bell. See the drool: “He seems to combine the conservatism of the former cluster with at least some of the popularity and stature of the latter pairing… What will matter is whether Thompson is prepared to campaign diligently for the nomination. If so, he likely will represent a force to be reckoned with.”

Yeah, whatever. Maybe. Actually, I suspect he would be a formidable candidate (and, I admit, there are things about him I do like). All these conservatives evidently want is a more popular (and presumably less bigoted) George Allen. Thompson may very well be their man.

Remember, Republicans don’t take a dump, son, without a plan.

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Copyright 2007 The Moderate Voice
  • Elrod

    Well, he’ll be 67 years old in 2009. His Senatorial career was pretty undistinguished. He’s an actor and an ideologue. I could see why Republicans would want him. But I don’t see him winning crossover votes in blue states that Giuliani could have won. Fred Thompson is just a more articulate George W. Bush. And it isn’t Bush’s inarticulateness that’s destroyed his Presidency. It’s his incompetence, ideological rigidity, and arrogance that killed him. All of it came to the fore with the Iraq war. What does Fred Thompson propose to do about Iraq?

  • kritter

    Well, maybe he can restore confidence in the post-Gonzales Dept of Justice because of his role on “Law and Order.” 🙂

  • Davebo

    I thought Republicans were dead set against those wacko Hollywood types inserting themselves into politics? (cough cough, Reagan, cough Sonny Bono, cough Fred Thompson).

    In fact, it’s hard to find many celebrity politicians on the Dem side with the exception of former politician Bill Bradly. Steve Largent? J.C. Watts?

    Oh, what. IOKIFYAR.

    Got it.

  • Sam

    He looks conservative, and we know he can at least act like he knows what he’s doing. What more could a republican ticket ask for?

  • Armand

    The conservatives are a funny bunch. On the one hand they constantly claim with a straight face that the American people supports their right-wing ideas and policies, yet they are fully aware the the people who most represent the “conservative values” (Allen (bigot), Frist (dubious business practices), Romney (illegal immigrants maintains his yard) and Gingrich (adulterer)) are essetially unelectable in a general election.

  • The Republican hope is that they can repeat the snake oil salesman miracle that is George Bush. If you act folksy and trustworthy enough it won’t matter how ideological you are since you can appeal to people’s “gut”.

  • Ray

    Davebo, I wouldn’t exactly call him a wacko Hollywood type.

    From a column by Mark M. Alexander:

    “After earning his J.D. from Vanderbilt University in 1967, Thompson had a private law practice and later served as an assistant U.S. attorney — making his mark weeding out corruption. After his prominent role as Republican counsel during Watergate, it was Thompson’s 1977 investigation that toppled the crooked administration of Tennessee Democrat Gov. Ray Blanton. In 1980, Thompson was tapped to serve as special counsel to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and in 1982, special counsel to the Senate Intelligence Committee.

    In 1985, the Blanton scandal was the subject of the film “Marie,” in which Thompson played himself — because the director could not find an actor who could capture Thompson’s power and determination. His success in that film led to his roles in more than 20 other big-screen hits including “No Way Out,” “The Hunt for Red October,” “Class Action,” “Cape Fear” and “In the Line of Fire.”

    In 1993, Tennessee’s Republican leadership convinced Thompson to return to public service in a campaign bid to fill the unexpired Senate term of then Vice President Albert Gore. Fred then demonstrated his formidable skills on the campaign trail. Despite all the support Bill Clinton and Al Gore could muster for popular six-term Democrat Rep. Jim Cooper, Thompson won a landslide victory in 1994, garnering 61 percent of the vote to Cooper’s 39 percent — the largest victory margin in any statewide political contest in Tennessee history.

    Thompson’s success in his first campaign for national office did not pass without substantial note from the Democrat National Committee. He won by an even wider margin in his 1996 re-election bid. Rest assured, the DNC fears a Thompson draft for the presidency.

    Thompson’s record as a U.S. Senator from 1994 to 2003 shows that he was on the right side of every critical issue. As chairman of the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs from 1997 to 2001, he voted for national-debt reduction, the all-important balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution, a presidential line-item veto to eliminate congressional pork and efforts to privatize elements of Social Security. He supported legislation in the interest of free enterprise and opposed many regulatory and tax measures. He opposed growth in social-welfare programs, including expansions in Medicare and welfare for immigrants. He supported efforts to decentralize or disenfranchise unconstitutional government programs.”

  • Elrod

    He voted to privatize Social Security. That went over well. Notice that the article doesn’t mention his support for the Iraq war. Fred Thompson is a right-winger who sounds folksy so Republicans think he’s like Bush before Bush collapsed into failure.

  • pacatrue

    I disagree with Thompson, but he appears to honestly be fighting for what he believes. He appears to be fair and non-corrupt. He is also a good communicator, which is a strength. Remember that one of Bush’s great weaknesses is his almost complete inability to persuade anyone of anything without threats. I will not vote for Thompson because I disagree with his postions, but the U.S. would be well-served if the conservative section of the Republican party were composed of many more Thompsons. What I am trying to say is that he seems to be a competent, fair, and practical man with whom I disagree.

  • Ray posts an article that says in part

    and efforts to privatize elements of Social Security. He supported legislation in the interest of free enterprise and opposed many regulatory and tax measures. He opposed growth in social-welfare programs, including expansions in Medicare and welfare for immigrants. He supported efforts to decentralize or disenfranchise unconstitutional government programs.�

    So he’s from the right wing branch of the whacko family instead of the left wing branch so frequently associated with Hollywood. An extreme ideologue is an extreme ideologue.

  • Ray

    Jim Satterfield writes:

    “So he’s from the right wing branch of the whacko family instead of the left wing branch so frequently associated with Hollywood. An extreme ideologue is an extreme ideologue.”

    No. I’m saying he’s not a Hollywood wacko at all. His main career had been law and politics, not arts and crafts. I happen to have agreed with the social security privatization issue. The whole idea of it was you would be allowed to invest a portion in only the exact same mutual funds program that all Federal civilian employees currently use. Why shouldn’t we be able to get a better return on our money, too? I’ll take a 10 – 12% return anytime.

    Although the article omits it, it was welfare for illegal immigrants, not immigrants in general.

    And decentralizing unconstitutional programs is bad?!?

  • C Stanley

    Well, when Democrats start reacting this strongly and trying to paint a two term US Senator as nothing more than a Hollywood lightweight, you’ve got my attention. Something about Thompson must be worrying to the Democrats.

  • I don’t regard him as a lightweight. I simply realize that he’s an ideologue of the far right. Ray may agree with his goals but I don’t think that Thompson’s branch of the party is interested in partial replacement of Social Security but it’s complete elimination. It’ obvious from his positions that he agrees with AEI and CEI and that’s their real goal, not a reform intended to improve the system.

  • http://www.grassrootsvoter.com

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    http://www.grassrootsvoter.com

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