Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Oct 8, 2006 in At TMV | 54 comments

Medicaid, Not All Is Swell

The Washington Post reports:

Thousands of low-income children have been unable to enroll in Virginia’s Medicaid program since July 1 because of new, tougher federal rules requiring proof of citizenship and identity, state officials said.

Officials for the state program for the poor and disabled said as many as 10,000 eligible children are living without health care largely because their families have been unable to present original birth certificates and other needed documentation to state or local Medicaid officials.
[…]
The new federal rules, designed to curb fraud by illegal immigrants, require passports, birth certificates or other identifying documents to be shown when people apply for Medicaid benefits or during annual reenrollment in the program. Parents are also required to offer sworn affidavits as proof of a child’s identity.
[…]
“We’re talking about families that don’t have a lot of resources,” said Shelby Gonzales, director of Partnership for Healthier Kids, a Fairfax County program run by Inova Health System. She and other advocates said families are showing up at social services departments looking for medical coverage but never follow through because of the extra layer of bureaucracy. “There are just a lot of practical reasons why it’s been difficult,” she said.

Birth certificates? Doesn’t one automatically receive a birth certificate at the moment one reports to state officials that a child has been born?
Passports: sure some people are poor, but it’s not as if one needs a passport every other month or so. In the Netherlands once every five years. Combine that with the costs…

I am sorry, I might sound cold here, but is this a problem caused by the US government, or by people themselves? If I am missing something, inform me, but ‘giving up due to the bureaucracy’? Well, bureaucracy is something like a natural enemy to me, but blaming bureaucracy for not doing something that’s necessary for one’s (child’s) health…

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2006 The Moderate Voice
  • SnarkyShark

    There is a basic difference form EU and US. Over there you have the reasonable expectation of achieving successful results. That is not always the case here.
    So when you weigh how to spend those scarce reasorces you have to weigh the success/faliure ratio also.

  • capelza

    One needs an official birth certificate to get a passport. Getting an official birth certificate (and not the cutesy one they give you at the hospital) is a time consuming operation…not as simple as it sounds.

  • Jim S

    capelza is correct. The birth certificate received at the hospital is not the one that is acceptable for this purpose. The state of Missouri made presentation of documents like this a requirement for renewing driver’s licenses recently. I had to take some time from work and drive over to the local office of vital statistics to present picture identification and pay a fee to get mine. Not a huge deal for me, just a minor inconvenience. But for someone with no car, an unforgiving boss or very limited financial means? What if they’ve moved from one state to another? I have no idea how they’d go about getting that paperwork. It can’t be done by mail.

  • Tommy

    How many of these thousands are the children of illegal immigrants?

    Sorry, but you can’t afford to come up with a birth certificate? I doubt that.

  • Tommy

    Jim S.,

    But for someone with no car, an unforgiving boss or very limited financial means?

    Take a frickin’ bus before or after work or on the weekend!

    Again, how many of these thousands are the children of illegal immigrants?

  • Tommy

    What if they’ve moved from one state to another?

    I live in the Pacfic Northwest. I didn’t have a birth certificate at one point. But you can order birth certificates through the internet.

    Here are the states where you can do that:
    http://www.easybirthcertificate.com/

    Again, how many of these thousands are the children of illegal immigrants?

  • Rubyeyes

    Lol Tommy you are too funny. No wonder you have problems if you think a computer and internet access is standard issue for welfare recipients. Some people have no freakin’ idea what it means to be poor.

  • SnarkyShark

    Shorter Tommy

    Let them eat cake.

  • Rudi

    Tommy are you the new_tommy at LGF – LOL? Let them take the bus to buy that cake – LOL. Now skin color and the bell curve…..

  • BeYourGuest

    How much does the needed documentation cost?

    $20? $50? $100?

    Should $100 come between a child and health care? Should $20?

    And as for the “frickin’ bus”, there’s nothing like like the easy answer. As long as it’s actually going to work. As long as what you need is open on the weekends or before and after your work schedule.

    I went to http://www.easybirthcertificate.com/. It costs –doing the math in my head here–between $54.99 and 89.99, if your state does this. So, should $54.99 come between a child and health care?

  • interested

    Out of curiosity I checked Connecticut where I was born.

    How Do I Request A Birth Certificate?

    Connecticut law restricts access to birth records, so you must first verify that you are eligible to receive the certificate that you are requesting. (See above “Who can request a certified copy of a birth certificate?�)

    If you are eligible to receive the certificate, you may request it either by mail or in person. Complete the Application for Copy of Birth Certificate available on this site and mail it or bring it in person to the vital records office of the town or city where the birth occurred, where the mother resided at the time of the birth, or to the State Vital Records Office. See the Connecticut Town Clerk and Registrar Directory. Connecticut regulations do not allow requests made by telephone.

    You must submit a copy of a photographic identification (Do Not Submit Originals). The identification must be a valid, government issued document. Acceptable forms of identification are:

    – Driver’s license

    – State issued identification card

    – Government issued employment identification

    – Passport

    If you do not have an acceptable form of photographic identification, you may submit photocopies of two of the following documents:

    – social security card;

    – written verification of identity from employer;

    – automobile registration;

    – copy of utility bill showing name and address;

    – checking account deposit slip stating name and address;

    – voter registration card.

    Sections S7-51 &S7-51A.

    Not that bad really, I can do it from Texas without flying anywhere. Little hassle and it costs 5 bucks but a whole bunch cheaper than that 50 bucks.

  • Interested thanks for that example. I am not trying to be cold here: if it is impossible for a lot of people, it seems reasonable for Americans to call for a change in the system but… this all seems doable and the demands seem to be reasonable to me… The government should have to fill in one’s forms for one should it?

  • Jim S

    interested,

    First, is that just the birth certificate or is it the “certified” birth certificate with the official state seal imprinted on it that you’ll get by mail? Only the latter one is acceptable in Missouri (And other states too, I believe.).

    Let’s see, the state you’re currently in demands the birth certificate before you can get the ID. The state you were born in demands the ID before you can get the certificate. Yes, it’s entirely possible for someone who is really poor and unemployed, which describes lots of Medicaid recipients to not have the things you cite in order to get that birth certificate.

  • Jim S

    Tommy, the place I had to go had almost no bus service. Some cities/towns are like that and some have no public transportation. Secondly, these offices aren’t open on evenings or weekends. They keep regular first shift office hours. Geez, that qualifies as one of the dumbest statements I’ve read in a while.

  • interested

    Jim

    the links state “certified” birth certificate.

    And your not reading it – for connecticut

    If you do not have an acceptable form of photographic identification, you may submit photocopies of two of the following documents:

    – social security card;

    – written verification of identity from employer;

    – automobile registration;

    – copy of utility bill showing name and address;

    – checking account deposit slip stating name and address;

    – voter registration card.

  • Eric

    Your totaly wrong MvG,
    Haven’t you figured out by know that expecting anyone to take responsibility for their situation is wrong? Asking that they put forth some effort before they get free shit is racist or classist and wrong!!!

  • BeYourGuest

    Does $5 seem fair to everybody, then?

    I ask because the minimum wage is $5.15. I guess some of that goes to taxes. Probably the guy–or, more likely, single woman–who makes the minimum wage doesn’t have an internet connection. So there’s also the bus rides to and from the public library. We’re probably above $5 that quickly, aren’t we? For someone who makes the minimum wage? For someone who is poor?

    I am not trying to call anybody cold or mean. But it seems to me that there are difficulties poor people have to overcome that nice middle-class people cannot even imagine.

    And when it comes to healthcare, I also imagine that even nice middle-class people reach a point where they too need assistance, brcause out-of-pocket costs are just too much for them.

  • interested

    That’s a question you have to balance out.

    Should it be free medication so that even illegals get it, at the cost of everyone? Even in that case someone making 5.15 per hour would be not only paying for their own – but also paying for someone else – eating into the 5.15 per hour.

    The money has to come from somewhere.

    And yes I can imagine, I’ve had to balance out gas to get to work or food to eat that night, went months straight eating only spaghetti cause it was the cheapest thing I could get.

    And your right, they and others do need help every now and then for medical care – but you also have to balance it out so your not paying for Mexico’s medical care. And that’s something we’re already doing and it’s costing us big time.

  • Rubyeyes

    Virginia Vital Records

    Apparantly there is only one office, which is located in Richmond. So much for the bus idea, if you don’t live in Richmond, but it sure sounded plausible Tommy.

    As far as passports. In the US they are good for 10 years – well they used to be. I don’t have one, there really is no need, unless you travel internationally and since we are talking poor I doubt they travel internationally that much. US Passports cost $97 (first time) and lo and behold they require a picture id anyway so not really useful as a form of id. Last time I got a passport those special 2×2 pictures were quite costly. Well they sure seemed costly when I was in college 15 years ago.

  • Rudi

    From the article:

    The rule is part of last year’s Deficit Reduction Act, which President Bush signed into law in February.

    It’s “NICE” that the DRA is reducing the deficit by knocking off the poor from Medicaid, but how does the DRA address earmarks, PorkBarrels and fraud and incompetence at DoD and FEMA?

  • Tommy

    Rubyeyes,

    Lol Tommy you are too funny. No wonder you have problems if you think a computer and internet access is standard issue for welfare recipients.

    Ever heard of a public library? There is this thing called a public library where you can use the internet or even many community colleges allow some public use of the internet and, of course, you can also order birth certificates by phone (dare I suggest even welfare recipients can find a phone booth if need be?) and….

    …and, well, this may all be a little over your head. It may be too complicated, I guess.

    Jeez. What is your major malfunction?

  • interested

    DRA address earmarks, PorkBarrels and fraud and incompetence at DoD and FEMA?

    well saying DoD and FEMA is being very selective and simplistic. But the essence of what your saying is indeed quite correct.

    We could cut out the pork, the earmarks, and likely have enough to fund medicaid properly. But you’d still need to do something for identification for we couldn’t fund it properly while taking care of illegal’s as well.

  • Jim S

    Thank you for the response, interested. I realize that it’s only for Connecticut.

  • Matt

    As I live in Fairfax County, let me just say that, we have a great health and human services system in this county, that will help poor people who are affected by this stupid Medicare decision. If anybody has ever tried to get a new ID to replace a lost one, the process is byzantine and ridiculous. I feel that this is just one more way for Medicare to save some bucks. Its sad. Fairfax is one of, if not the most, richest counties by income in the country. And we can afford to help those displaced by Medicare, I shudder to think of people in Lousiana who’ve lost everything, who will have to deal with this stupid law, now and in the future.

  • JLE

    The federal government exempted severely disabled and elderly individuals from this requirement because a)these individuals have already proved they were citizens when they were enrolled in other govt. programs years ago and b) often these documents are not readily available ex. a women with Alzheimer’s may not be able to immediately recall where her birth certificate is yet she needs to go to the doctor now and cannot wait several weeks until she does
    However, the government DID NOT exempt foster children from this requirement. These children have already proved they were citizens and to make them wait while govt. agencies find their citizenship documents before they can receive medical care is ridiculous. Those children have already been through enough.

  • To all bleeding hearts. Get real. This documentation issue, treated with total exsanguination by the NYT in an editorial today, is all about enabling Democrats to herd unqualified voters–illegal immigrants included–to the polls every November.

    New York, in particular, simply requires an applicant for voter registration to check a box:
    [] U.S. citizen. That’s it. Any poll-watcher who
    insisted on seeing proof of citizenship would be arrested for disturbing the peace. That’s called small-d democracy in blue states.

  • Rudi

    This is just another example of a partisan bill pandering to interest groups. The problem with the TRULY NEEDY, and not illegal aliens, is that they cannot afford K Street interest groups. Ron Paul has a take on citizenship that I agree with, illegals children born here get no automatic citizenship. This won’t fix Medicaid but it makes sense and addresses illegals without sticking it to the poor.

  • Tommy:

    Jeez. What is your major malfunction?

    From the comments policy:
    “5) Name-calling, personal attacks, racist comments or use of profanity by any commenter, whether they are by persons who agree or disagree with the views expressed by The Moderate Voice will NOT be tolerated and will result in the deletion of the comment and the banning of the commenter’s ISP address, without notice. In some cases a comment may be deleted and the writer will be given another chance.”

    I stronly urge you from refraining from using personal attacks like that. We are becoming more and more strict in this area due to certain developments the last months (and more: last weeks) orso.

  • interested

    how does it address illegals? Your assuming that illegals will say – ahh alright i’m illegal I won’t go for it.

  • Tommy

    Eric,

    I second Eric’s remarks about personal responsibility. The bottom line is that people have to make some effort and all of society cannot be held responsible if some people are just too lazy or stupid to use the resources they have available. Granted, it isn’t the childrens’ fault, but parents are allowed, in our society, to do all sorts of things that are not in their children’s best interests that we, as a society, cannot prevent.

    If the massive cost of a birth certificate is an issue, write your Congressional representatives and ask that they set up a hardship program for those who cannot afford a birth certificate. I can live with getting people their birth certificates for free if they cannot fork up $30, $40, $50. Or ask that they work in a clause in some upcoming legislation that will allow people their medical benefits for a short period of time (a month or two) while assisting them in obtaining a birth certificate or, in some other way, verifying their citizenship status. I’d fully support programs like that.

    Just don’t open the floodgates towards having all of America having to foot the bill for yet more healthcare for millions of illegal immigrants indefinitely. We already spend a huge amount having to cover the costs of illegal immigrants in our emergency rooms. I don’t want more illegals on the dole. There are real Americans who are struggling and could use that money. It isn’t fair to those who are truly struggling yet being resourceful.

  • Tommy

    5) Name-calling, personal attacks, racist comments or use of profanity by any commenter, whether they are by persons who agree or disagree with the views expressed by The Moderate Voice will NOT be tolerated and will result in the deletion of the comment and the banning of the commenter’s ISP address, without notice. In some cases a comment may be deleted and the writer will be given another chance.”

    Sorry, but when someone addresses a post to me saying “no wonder you have problems” I thought it was a fair retort to ask what their problem was.

  • Tommy, yes, same goes for RubyEyes (I seemingly missed that one).

    Debate, but without getting personal.

  • interested

    Michael,

    Sorry I missed your earlier comment.

    Interested thanks for that example. I am not trying to be cold here: if it is impossible for a lot of people, it seems reasonable for Americans to call for a change in the system but… this all seems doable and the demands seem to be reasonable to me… The government should have to fill in one’s forms for one should it?

    I agree, and I think we should do all we can to make it better for the very poor to receive medication and medical care.

    But like voting – you should prove you are who you say you are. To me Connecticut’s system is leaving it open for fraud – but there-in lies the difficulty. How do you make it available for people to get yet still have it in place to make sure they’re citizens to begin with?

    For example, in the border city I live in – we pay about 6 – 8 million per year for health care for illegals – heck this city doesn’t even have 1 million citizens total. Why should I pay for the inability of another country to take care of it’s own citizens when I would rather spend that 6 – 8 million to help citizens of this country get medical care. Because by paying for another countries health care – we are neglecting our own. Plus in many cities – it is illegal for hospitals or police to question someone if they’re illegal or not. And it’s illegal for the hospitals to turn illegals away.

    Many people think you can pass a law and illegals will follow it (they are illegal to begin with).

    In that aspect I don’t have a problem with Tommy’s suggestion on the creation of a fund – or whatever – to help people gain their ID’s – and prove who they say they are. If anything that would help against the argument that some have that people should not need to prove citizenship to be able to vote.

  • JLE

    And one more thing…As a devout Christian, I would hope that we as a society would want to make it easier for a child to receive medical care – not harder.

  • Gary

    Michael,

    What kind of identification do poor children in your country need to get treatment, and how much does that identification cost?

    I ask this not to be going after you, but because I think most Europeans have very different access paths. I’m truly curious what is involved in obtaining needed medications, or treatment for a broke ankle, in most European countries.

  • Rubyeyes

    I appologize Tommy.

    You can not order a birth certificate by phone – please click the link there are three options to order.

    If you are going to order over the internet you need … a credit card. How many credit cards do you think are offered to people earning $5.15 an hour? As the saying goes … It’s hell being poor.

  • Randal

    Maybe im off base, but i know that if you are born in amaerica you are a citizen, but if you are born of an american citizen, say in england, are you still an american citizen? If so i say this:

    why do we require identification beyond the fact that the child is of the parents trying to get the healthcare. If being born from american parents grants citizenship, then isnt proof of the parent being a citizen good enough?

  • interested

    The child needs a sworn affidavit from the parents – who need to prove that they’re citizens. I would imagine that a birth certificate would work in place of an affidavit – but it’d need to be certified, which goes back to the discussion about obtaining identification.

  • Kim Ritter

    Usually I am on the more liberal side of the argument, but I must agree with Interested in this case. Programs like Medicaid are threatened by cuts because of fraudulent abuse by those who shouldn’t be enrolled in it in the first place. I worked in a primary care office for 9 years, and we ran into a lot of it. I agree that it is the parent’s responsibility to have the child’s birth certificate on hand. Everything can’t be dumped on the government.

  • Randal

    Ahh i understand now….yes it is a sad fact that those few who abuse the system are causing for so much strtife for those who need the system. As for a way to fix it….i really dont know. there really is no easy way to guarentee citizen outside of personal privacy. I mean if every american citizen had his/her DNA on record from birth then the medicare office could simply take a sample of DNA to determine if you are really you and if you are a citizen. But i find the databasing of all american’s by any measure as against privacy. So pretty much its a question as to weither or not you cherish the privacy we currently have and weither or not you are willing to accept infringments on that privacy to produce cheaper, more secure ways of determining citizenship.

  • BeYourGuest

    interested–

    Thanks for clarifying. From the first few comments, I thought the issue was just poverty.

    As for illegal aliens, I don’t think there is a simple answer. They come here because there is a market for them. In another thread, I complained that merkets are immoral. This is another example of that.

    When cops try to stop illegal drugs, they prefer to go after the gangs behind them, as opposed to spending their resources going after a bunch of individual pathetic junkies. Maybe cops should go after the executives of agribusinesses or restraunt chains? Since, unlike heroin distrubution, those aren’t inherently illegal activities, maybe there would be a deterrent effect throughout those industries?

  • Tommy

    You can not order a birth certificate by phone – please click the link there are three options to order.

    This isn’t the only place that handles birth certificates. You can order birth certificates over the phone. I ordered mine over the phone while in Washington state. I was born in Texas. It was an official birth certificate with state seal.

    If you are going to order over the internet you need … a credit card. How many credit cards do you think are offered to people earning $5.15 an hour? As the saying goes … It’s hell being poor.

    Open up a bank account. My bank doesn’t charge me anything to open up such an account (though they recommend starting it with a minimum of $20 and some banks require you to have something like $20 in your account to start) and I get a card that allows me to make purchases via credit or debit. My card can be used to make purchases over the internet anywhere you can use a Visa without any problems and I never had to credit-qualify for the card because I’m not actually getting any credit beyond what is in my checking account. Most ATM cards these days can be used for both credit and debit purchases. Granted, you actually have to have money in your account to pay for what you purchase, but that is it. I don’t own any credit cards myself.

  • interested

    BYG

    When cops try to stop illegal drugs, they prefer to go after the gangs behind them, as opposed to spending their resources going after a bunch of individual pathetic junkies. Maybe cops should go after the executives of agribusinesses or restraunt chains? Since, unlike heroin distrubution, those aren’t inherently illegal activities, maybe there would be a deterrent effect throughout those industries?

    Here is where I veer off the path with some on here, as some think that just shutting down businesses will take care of the problem. Course it doesn’t answer what your going to do with a sudden flush of millions of illegals without work – anyway. Heck the Mexican government puts out literature for it’s citizens educating them on how to enter the US and start working illegally.

    I do favor a type of guest worker program – I think the one suggested was shot down without having a serious discussion about it – the suggested form was far from perfect but it needed to be tweaked it to get it right. The hard part is to get both parties over their fear of seeming to be anti-hispanic. On that one – I wrote to my Senator asking them what the rush was for on illegal immigration – for those folks need to spend time on the border – see the situation with it’s vast amount of ramifications and address accordingly.

    They’re not going to make a law that’s realistic from D.C. It is market driven as you can see any influx of immigrants slows and sometimes reverses if we are in a recession.

    Anyway – your right they do need to go after business’s that hire illegals. but that’s just one part of it all. It’s a vastly complex issue. One that needs to address the business’s that hire them to the police when they cannot ask if your illegal to even hospitals still giving care – but bill the origin country. As long as it is cheaper and easier for someone to come here illegally – they will continue to do so. I for one see no sense in giving Mexico aid – yet incur costs of their being here. If we remove those costs from the aid it would impact Mexico and provoke change.

    But then again we’d be hurting Mexicans that do not come here illegally. And creating more anti-US behavior in an already shifting South America.

    Complex.

  • Mericano

    30 years ago I was an eligibility determiner (in Virginia). The documentation requirements were never user friendly, and I am sure they still are not. The hospital birth cert won’t do, it must be the state issued one with a seal, which is NOT free. When your income is in the teens, this is a burden. A passport is of no value if you are not planning international travel (if your income is in the teens, you are NOT) and it requires that same birth certificate to obtain.

    It is interesting to talk about ordering it on the internet, but there are skill reasons why people earn in the teens and these same skills interfere with being high end internet users.

    One of the reasons for people to NOT get Medicaid in Virginia may be for failure to comply with documentation requirements (according to the news source cited). What a surpprise! Publicans never before worried more to protect the wealth of the taxpayer than the wellbeing of the children.

  • Kim Ritter

    What about social workers? Their job is to break down barriers for the poor and enable them to use each state’s social programs.

  • Rubyeyes

    Tommy the aritcle has absolutely nothing to do with Texas so your phone-in experience is irrelevant.

  • What kind of identification do poor children in your country need to get treatment, and how much does that identification cost?

    Firstly, they have to be insured, secondly, one can be insured by applying for it, confirming one’s identity by using ID’s and alike. In short: what Medicaid is demanding as well.
    And, o, a passport or ID is much more expensive here than 5 bucks.

  • Gary

    Michael,

    What is the cost of the insurance? Do you have to be poor? If so–how poor and what is the means test?

    To get insurance here you just have to fork over a few hundred dollars every month. To get into Medicaid you have to be very pooor–and jump a lot of bureaucratic hoops designed to NOT give you service.

  • Do you have to be poor for what? We do not have a program like Medicaid for the poor. They have to be insured.
    Costs, depends per provider, but min. 1050, max. 1200 for now.

  • chmbrln

    Challenge:
    For those of you who imply that the people who have a difficult time getting a birth certificate for their child are not responsible, try this for one day:
    1) do not turn on your home computer
    2) do not start your car
    3) get your children to child care and yourself to work on time using public transportation
    4) accomplish one official task at the public library computer system, e.g. get a new driver’s license, register your car, etc.
    5) buy groceries

    Keep in mind while you are doing this that, if you’re making minimum wage, you may have to decide whether you can buy both the food and your driver’s license at the same time.

    I would encourage you to not treat this as a mental exercise, but actually do it. Find out how easy it is to truly count on the bus schedule being correct. (How do you get the bus schedule without the Internet or a car? – Try getting the info you need via phone with every minute on your cell ticking off another $.25).

    Understand that you’re only doing this for one day, and there are people who are doing this every day and have been for quite a while.

    Truly walk a mile in their shoes.

  • Kim Ritter

    I still think the poor can turn to social workers to help them get documentation for their kids-that’s what they are there for. Any program that is seen to be subject to fraudulent abuse will also be subject to budget cuts. If cost is an issue, I’d be open to removing that barrier. But I still think in this day and age, everyone should have ID.

  • Jim B

    MvgD,

    And, o, a passport or ID is much more expensive here than 5 bucks

    Read above about 5-7 comments and you will see that a Passport in the US is $97, plus you must provide your own photo, usually runs around $10. It takes roughly 2-3 months to get that passport back btw.

    I just moved to Kansas from Texas, my new Drivers license was $45. I had to show two forms of ID, one w/ photo which could be a passport or military ID, or another Government issued ID. The closest place to my new home to get that DL..about 5 miles. The public transportation system doesn’t run out where I live. So if I had no car, I’d be walking. Lucky for me I don’t make $5.15/hr. Which translates to $41/day. So if I made minimum wage, I’d have to spend a days wages to get a drivers license. Not to mention I’d have to take some time away from work to go get it.

    And Tommy,
    As for going on Saturday.
    The hours are Tuesday-Friday 7:00-5:45. This is for a DL only. Your idea on a 2 month period to get someone through until they got their ID (birth cert, etc) was probably a good idea, how it goes into action, who knows.

  • Tommy

    chmbrln

    Challenge:

    For those of you who imply that the people who have a difficult time getting a birth certificate for their child are not responsible, try this for one day:
    1) do not turn on your home computer
    2) do not start your car
    3) get your children to child care and yourself to work on time using public transportation
    4) accomplish one official task at the public library computer system, e.g. get a new driver’s license, register your car, etc.
    5) buy groceries

    Keep in mind while you are doing this that, if you’re making minimum wage, you may have to decide whether you can buy both the food and your driver’s license at the same time.

    Ummm….yeah. You are going to do none of those 5 things, yet you are somehow going to be making minimum wage doing none of those things. Sure. Either you are making minimum wage and have means of getting to where you need to go (or internet access if you are working for some stay-at-home company) or you are on public assistance and you have time to be doing what you need to do.

    No excuses.

  • saltandlight

    I work as a volunteer for a non-profit agency that advocates for foster children. All children in the foster care system automatically become eligible for their state’s medicare program. Social workers are able to enroll them without birth certificates because of the children’s circumstances (being removed for neglect and/or abuse). As soon as the records are obtained, the social workers file the information with the provider.

    Low income parents who have not had children removed have access through several means to social workers to assist them in obtaining their child’s birth certificate (food stamp recipients, WIC recipients, Aid for Dependant Children Recipients, free lunch program in public school, etc). All of the social workers I work with are more than happy to help these parents or to direct them to proper agency. Additionally, most public schools in the U. S. now require a copy of a child’s birth certificate for enrollment.

    The only ones I know of where this may not be required is when the child is an illegal alien. The children still qualify for school lunches, immunizations, (free in most counties), etc…

    Just my 2 cents.

Twitter Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com