Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Dec 6, 2009 in Places, Religion, Society | 5 comments

Hasidic Rabbi Helps Montana Police Officer Speak Hebrew to His Dog

This is absolutely the most totally charming, delightful, heart-warming story I have read in ages. Here is the first paragraph:

In Montana, a rabbi is an unusual sight. So when a Hasidic one walked into the State Capitol last December, with his long beard, black hat and long black coat, a police officer grabbed his bomb-sniffing German shepherd and went to ask the exotic visitor a few questions.

Of course, the reader is meant to think here that the police officer wanted his dog to sniff the rabbi for a bomb.

After elaborating for several paragraphs on how there used to be a lot more Jews in Montana before most of them moved away, but recently Montana’s Jewish community has been experiencing something of a come-back, Eric Stern, the author of the piece, tells us why the Hasidic rabbi is there at the State Capitol:

And yet, in a minor revival, Montana now has three rabbis, two in Bozeman and one (appropriately) in Whitefish. They were all at the Capitol on the first night of Hannukah last year to light a menorah in the ornate Capitol rotunda, amid 100-year-old murals depicting Sacajawea meeting Lewis and Clark, the Indians beating Custer, and the railway being built. The security officer and the dog followed the rabbi into the rotunda, to size him up.

To size him up, as a possible security threat?

Not exactly:

The menorah was lighted and Hebrew prayers chanted, while the officer watched from a distance with his dog. He figured he would let it all go down and then move in when the ceremony was done. The dog sat at attention, watching the ceremony with a peculiar expression on its face, a look of intense interest. When the ceremony was over, the officer approached the Hasidic rabbi.

“I’m Officer John Fosket of the Helena Police,” he said. “This is Miky, our security dog. Do you mind if I ask you a few questions?”

Miky, pronounced Mikey, is in a Diaspora of his own. He was born in an animal shelter in Holland and shipped as a puppy to Israel, where he was trained by the Israeli Defense Forces to sniff out explosives. Then one day, Miky got a plane ticket to America. Rather than spend the standard $20,000 on a bomb dog, the Helena Police Department had shopped around and discovered that it could import a surplus bomb dog from the Israeli forces for the price of the flight. So Miky came to his new home in Helena, to join the police force.

The problem, the officer explained, was that Miky had been trained entirely in Hebrew.

When Officer Fosket got Miky, he was handed a list of a dozen Hebrew commands and expressions, like “Hi’ sha’ er” (stay!), Ch’pess (search!), and “Kelev tov” (good doggy). He made flashcards and tried practicing with Miky. But poor Miky didn’t respond.

Officer Fosket (who is not Jewish) suspected he wasn’t pronouncing the words properly. He tried a Hebrew instructional audio-book from the local library, but no luck. The dog didn’t always understand what he was being ordered to do. Or maybe Miky was just using his owner’s bad pronunciation as an excuse to ignore him. Either way, the policeman needed a rabbi.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2009 The Moderate Voice
  • dduck12

    Nice story. Thanks KK.

  • rfyork

    Kathy,

    It’s a great story as far as it goes. Did the rabbi actually help? Did it work? Or, was Miky just finding an excuse to nibble biscuits and avoid the Montana winter? That’s what I’d do.

    Rick York

    • dduck12

      Tune in to NPR, they will try to interview the dog today.

  • adesnik

    I wonder if that dog can speak Yiddish, too.

    • dduck12

      NPR tried a Doberman that speaks yiddish. No go. Now they think the dog has been malingering and will be demoted to White House guard duty at the VIP gate.

Twitter Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com