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Posted by on Dec 27, 2012 in Business, Economy, Environment | 15 comments

Biggest Solar Power Company in U.S. Could More than Double in Size (Guest Voice)



Biggest Solar Power Company in U.S. Could More than Double in Size (via Clean Technica)

  With control over 320 megawatts of solar power generating capacity, Florida-based NextEra Energy Resources already calls itself the biggest solar power company in the U.S. (at least for now), and it is about to add a whopping 750 more megawatts in one fell swoop if the Environmental Impact Statement…



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  • dduck

    This sounds a little like a PR piece. Just saying.

  • slamfu

    PR pieces have a lot in common with reporting on accomplishments if they actually happen. This is great news, and I had no idea we have made over 10 gigawatts of production in the last few years. That’s pretty huge. And another 24 to come soon. Me likey.

  • petew

    dduck,

    Then any project which is extensively described, is also a PR project.

    Although Republicans made a stink over Solyndra, and some other facilities which the government invested in, VERY FEW of the numerous (more than a thousand I believe) facilities, and, green energy projects backed by the government have failed. It’s great that we are finally seeing large scale applications for solar energy—primarily because no matter what other sources we invest in, solar and wind, are bound to be among the mega-energy sources of the future. Congratulations to all of the dedicated scientists and politicians who continue supporting and developing these vital power sources! Despite all of the propaganda being circulated, in order to discredit what will just, out of necessity, have to be included in our future, many of us are still continuing to keep our eyes on the ball!

  • dduck

    petew, reporting (the good kind) is different than PR. I have worked with PR people, and believe me, never a negative word or thought ever was said about their clients.

  • dduck

    One of the problems with vast solar arrays is dust and dirt on the panels. They usually use water for cleaning but that is scarce in the sunny desert areas and takes it away from already scarce supplies for agriculture and drinking. There is at least one new technology that may do the cleaning without water, so maybe that problem will be ameliorated.
    Transmitting the power generated is very costly and another big factor for solar:
    http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/news/article/2010/08/is-the-transmission-problem-a-farce

    Waiting in the wings is the huge potential for Fusion power:
    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120810-the-quest-to-recreate-the-sun

    Meanwhile, new smaller fission power plants can be located closer to users and could benefit from more research and subsidy dollars as would the fusion types.

    The sun is nice, but why bet the farm and more subsidy dollars on it (especially a farm that needs water an enormous shortage of which exists in sunnier climes.)
    Just sayin.

  • slamfu

    Dduck, what you are describing is merely a hurdle, not a fundamental problem to the process. Hurdles are part of every new emerging industry.

  • dduck

    Slam, Well, wind seems to be dying down (not efficient without subsidies for the last 20 years) and those are not mole hills, they are big hurdles that have been around for decades for solar that still require subsidies. I sincerely hope they fix the panel cleaning problem, cause water is the current/next world problem.
    And, I agree, let’s get over the “hurdles” for nuclear.

  • petew

    dduck,

    Yes I know that PR involves never saying a negative word, but, regardless of the problems this industry may face in the future, didn’t the story frequently describe how many more megawatts are planned to be added to power plant capacities? To me, that alone represents good news since the future will absolutely require massive production of energy.

    Then, again, it would be unrealistic to expect any description concerning this new industry to include moping and sighing over how many problems will have to be faced in the future, so, when we read such an article we can’t really expect anything else than a positive sell. The final results may not be as impressive, but any progress is positive progress.

  • dduck

    petew, ok let’s forget any problems/hurdles and go for progress, even if it is comes in the form of a nice glossy pr piece, screw moping and sighing. And, nuclear, your day has not come yet, wait til we run out of water.

  • ShannonLeee

    Engineers have created new solar panels that DOUBLE the energy output of the current panel technology. We will get better and better at solar. Soon, government supported research will negate the need for solar subsidies. We need to keep pushing on all energy types…including making dirty energy cleaner.

  • dduck

    yep.

  • ShannonLeee

    Just as a side note… Germany has a nice amount of wind energy in the north, but they do not have the infrastructure to move all of that power south.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-10-25/windmills-overload-east-europe-s-grid-risking-blackout-energy.html

    a good example of building without thinking…not exactly something Germans are known for..

  • dduck

    SL, sorry about the hurdle.

  • slamfu

    We are pushing all energy types. Energy development is up across the board isn’t it? Coal is taking a bit of a hit but that’s mostly because natural gas is kicking its can in the open market. And I suppose nuclear is still under its usual stigma in this country despite being pretty well accepted just about everywhere else, but for the ages I’ve wanted a president that said “Lets do everything” and it appears that is what we have now. Traditional fuels will carry us over the next decades we’ll need to develop and set up infrastructure on solar, wind, and whatever else we come up with in the meantime. We are currently in the middle of taking the balanced and aggressive approach needed to address our energy needs. This is what competence looks like.

  • dduck

    This is what competence looks like.
    Really.

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