Zimmerman not guilty: Victory for new kind of civil rights era? (Guest Voice)

Steve Sack, The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Steve Sack, The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Zimmerman not guilty: Victory for new kind of civil rights era? (via The Christian Science Monitor)

Part of America sees the not guilty verdict in the George Zimmerman case as a travesty of justice, a modern iteration of Jim Crow, where a white man walks free after shooting an innocent black person, in this case an unarmed Florida teenager named Trayvon…



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Author: Guest Voice

  • ShannonLeee

    “cracker” is not a term for poor whites. It is for white people in general. It is a word that has no impact because it has no history.

  • rudi
  • http://www.americaincontext.com Barky

    The following has only just dawned on me:

    For decades, gun violence was centered in the inner cities. In the inner cities, significant amounts of gun violence results from the drug trade or crime in general. However, there is another significant quantity based on hate. Could be racial hate, but more likely it’s just because someone slighted someone else or wronged their gang or what-not.

    An expansion of gun ownership — especially unregulated gun ownership — will lead to the same behavior elsewhere. Someone hates someone else or antagonizes someone else: bang!

    We are becoming Murder Nation, and that really bothers me.

  • SteveK

    The white cracker does have a history.

    FWIW: “The Band” originally considered calling themselves “The Crackers”…

    Reunited with Helm, the Hawks began writing their own songs in a rented large pink house, which they affectionately named “Big Pink”, in West Saugerties (near Woodstock). When they went into the recording studio, they still did not have a name for themselves. Stories vary as to the manner in which they ultimately adopted the name “The Band.” In The Last Waltz, Manuel claimed that they wanted to call themselves either “The Honkies” or “The Crackers” (which they used when backing Dylan for a January 1968 concert tribute to Woody Guthrie), but these names were vetoed by their record label; Robertson suggests that during their time with Dylan everyone just referred to them as “the band” and it stuck. Initially, they disliked the moniker, but eventually grew to like it, thinking it both humble and presumptuous. Rolling Stone referred to them as “The band from Big Pink.”

    Rest in peace Levon…