‘Having Sown the Wind … America Reaps the Whirlwind’ – Iraqi and Jordanian Reactions to Boston

Does the United States government bare some responsibility for the pain being felt in Boston and around the country today? Amid the commentary coming in from around the world, from some quarters there is a certain sense of schadenfreude – which means in German to take pleasure in the pain of others. In these two articles posted today, one from Iraq’s Al-Iraq News and the other from Jordan’s Al Ghad, the case is made that Monday’s terrorist attack at the Boston Marathon is a direct result foreign policies related to an ill-conceived ‘war on terror’ and America’s use of terrorists as a foreign policy tool.

First, in a brief commentary from Al-Iraq News, in an article headlines Having Sown the Wind … America Reaps the Whirlwind, columnist Filah Al Mishaal expresses disgust at what the U.S. has done to his country, and asserts that the coming wave of terrorist attacks on America are a direct result of U.S. policies that created ‘Islamist political terrorist organizations’ in the first place.

America created al-Qaeda and extreme Islamist political terrorist organizations in many countries, to have them sow discord and sectarian conflict with left wing and nationalist parties in countries that were subject to its aggression. That includes Iraq, which is still paying the bill for America’s crimes and errors in the blood of innocent lives. The victims in Boston and other places are suffering as a result of a ball of fire striking back at America for its ever-increasing involvement in terror, according to the proverb: “they have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind”!

Then, in a velvet-glove version of the same narrative, columnist Jihad Al Muhaysin of Jordan’s Al Ghad, in an article headlined Bostonians Hit By the ‘Plague of the Century, writes that it was regrettable that innocent people were being killed in ‘counter-productive’ terrorist attacks before Boston, and it is just as regrettable now. And he lays responsibility for all of it at the foot of American foreign policy since the September 11 attacks.

Nowhere in the world is immune from this outrageous cycle of violence. The day before yesterday, Boston was the target. It is a sad thing indeed that the victims were helpless innocents who didn’t deserve to bear the burden of America’s global policies, and are not responsible for its consequences. The same applies to Iraq, Syria, Pakistan, Britain, France, and any place on the surface of the earth. … The plague of blood unleashed after September 11 is now striking everywhere.

READ ON IN ENGLISH OR ARABIC, OR READ MORE OF THE GLOBAL REACTION TO THE BOSTON BOMBINGS AT WORLDMEETS.US, your most trusted translator and aggregator of foreign news and views about our nation.

  

Author: WILLIAM KERN (Worldmeets.US)

Founder and Managing Editor of Worldmeets.US

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9 Comments

  1. The plague of blood unleashed after September 11 is now striking everywhere.

    Perhaps he should say The plague of blood unleashed on (and before) September 11 is now striking everywhere.

    We see the unending dance of death between Israel and their foes which has gone on since 1948 – 65 years – and are unendingly appalled.

  2. How does this article play in your mind out if the bomber(s) is/are twenty year old American white guy(s).

    I just saw the movie “The Company You Keep”.

  3. it is beyond naive to think that profound and EVERY DAY bombings and mass murders were not occurring across much of the world before 9-11. A simple read of history of the last even 75 years would shoot such an absurd idea down that somehow 9-11 unleashed whatever. 9-11 brought the entire mess of those who murder at will above the water line and into the consciousnesses of many more than before. To obliterate the incredibly violent mass murders in Burma/Myanmar/ Syria/ Iraq/E.Eu/ Russia and so many parts of the world prior to 9-11, whether by bombs, gas, phony riots, locking into churches and setting afire, poison… is ‘faux history’ and more full of holes than a sieve, entirely.

  4. Sydney Morning Herlad, Australia
    Gutless U.S. Senate
    Bows to Gun Lobby
    … Not Argument
    “Excuse me, next time
    the U.S. struts the world
    stage, claiming American
    exceptionalism, setting
    itself out as leader of the
    the so-called free world,
    it risks being dismissed
    as a nation of idiots.
    — CORRESPONDENT
    Paul McGeough

    http://worldmeets.us/ http://www.worldmeets.us/index.shtml#ixzz2QrR97Ftd

  5. While the left down there is often verbally abrassive toward Americans, and of America among themselves, the Aussies and Kiwis are like the Brits; they are our ‘brothers’ who argue all the time but would fight to the end to defend one another. And they know where most of the defending would come from if the sh*t hit the fan. The blokes and sheilas down under are some of the best people on earth. I try to listen to their ‘tough’ advice with that in mind. Don’t find it uncomfortable.

  6. @KP – As an erstwhile Brit who is now a US citizen, the perspective I have is of not wishing to see the US go down the same road that the UK did more than a century ago.

    I’m not just talking about foreign relations here… domestic unrest is another consequence of an arrogant, unenlightened ruling faction operating exclusively in furtherance of it’s own ends.

    When I was naturalized, my brother’s only comment was “So how does it feel to be a citizen of two countries that used to be great once?” I’m rapidly running out of reasons to disagree with that sentiment.

  7. Thanks, epiphyte. I don’t want the US to go down the road of the UK either. But I am willing to listen to your gripes. I probably agree with most of them. Feel free to rail on. Just don’t point it at me.

  8. As an American, who will be a citizen of the Republic of Ireland shortly, as a result of direct family ties, I am not interested in domestic unrest, the consequence of an arrogant, unenlightened ruling faction operating exclusively in furtherance of it’s own ends.

  9. While it would be fine with me if I never heard nor read the word, “schadenfreude” again, it’s easy to understand why some in other parts of the world are feeling it. It’s also easy to agree with the sentiments expressed by the Aussie correspondent. I say these things not because I don’t love my country, but because I do – which compels me to be honest about it.

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