“Titanic” Score: Boehner Outpolls Icebergs

John Boehner is reelected Speaker of the House, second in line of succession to the presidency, with only a ripple of disaffection from Tea Party Republicans, nine of whom voted against him in favor of Eric Cantor, Allen West and other loony tunes.

The new Congress starts with confirmation of the Captain that almost sank the Ship of State last weekend, with a few members of his crew expressing more confidence in icebergs.

Far away from frozen DC, the President is golfing in Hawaii after signing the fiscal bill with an autopen and promising to do more about reducing the national debt “in a balanced way that doesn’t put all the burden on seniors or students or middle-class families.”

That should give voters a warm and cozy feeling for the start of 2013 until they realize that he is promising to do so in concert with pretty much the same Gang That Couldn’t Shoot Straight over the past two years, described thus by astute observer Ezra Klein:

“Unfortunately, the polarization and paralysis exhibited by the 112th Congress are functions of long-term political trends, and there’s no evidence that they’ll lift anytime soon…”

MORE.

Author: ROBERT STEIN

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6 Comments

  1. Boehner deserves to remain in his post as Speaker of the House mainly because he seemed to be one of the few Republicans who actually used his sanity by agreeing to compromise.

    Members of the GOP may be upset, but his willingness to acquiesce on some key points may have ultimately saved the Republican party, as well as the US Congress itself. Because someone on the Republican side has actually dared to open a small crack in the wall of GOP obstructionism, Republicans have restored a small part of their credibility. This is important because, when you think of it, our entire government is built on a system of power sharing and checks and balances, which were designed to assure that all Americans are given a real and equal voice. And, thank God that Boehner has had the gumption to live up to the ideal of compromise as the natural outcome of that system. If his risk had not been taken, Americans may have become even more dissatisfied with the Government, and unmistakably Republicans would have been given the lion’s share of the credit for creating an even more dysfunctional Congress—and that’s not even mentioning what might have happened to our International credit rating!

  2. I agree with Pete. If the coalition that passed the tax legislation could be covinced to proceed with entitlement reform and immigration reform, both of which the GOP apparently wants and the Dems will have to face up to, we could surge ahead toward some balance and a real impact on the debt. And Mr. Boehner could be a real help in that.

    President Obama doesn’t have to run again and could be a real leader in moving these necessary reforms forward. We still have another year before the AHCA kicks in completely, but this year would be a great opportunity for real legislating. The Reps still have the Tea Party around their neck, but helping them break free of them (and the NRA) would be one of the greatest accomplishments in the history of our government.

  3. I think JB is doing a fair job given the hand, with jokers included, that he has.

  4. What Dduck said. Boehner is as good as anyone the GOP has to wrangle the fools he has to wrangle.

  5. As much as it pains me to say it — because at heart Boehner is a very ugly man in how he plays the political game, most notably his utter disdain for the middle class and most recently in yanking the Hurricane Sandy relief vote — petew has nailed it. Only 12 members of his own caucus, while a record for the past two decades, did not believe he should stay on as speaker, which is saying something given the huge divides within the GOP.

  6. The real question is…..who would take his place? Does anyone really want to hand the House to Cantor?!?!

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