President Obama Makes Two Decisions Worth Applauding (La Jornada, Mexico)

Perhaps not surprisingly, President Obama’s executive order to end deportations of undocumented children brought to the U.S. by their parents is proving popular in Mexico. For La Jornada, columnist Arturo Balderas Rodríguez applauds the president’s actions over stiff Republican resistance, and sees it as a sign that Obama is finally returning to the ‘path’ of fulfilling his promises.

For La Jornada, Arturo Balderas Rodríguez starts off this way:

Within a month, President Barack Obama has made two decisions that have come in for harsh criticism from the more conservative end of the U.S. political spectrum. The first was his support for same-sex marriage, which earned him the warmest praise from all liberal sectors of the country, including the ever-growing gay community. Echoes of the decision resound in the Supreme Court, which will soon will have to make a decision on the existing ban in a handful of states limiting right of individuals unite for life with whoever they please.

Obama didn’t have to wait long to receive a barrage of criticism from a large number of organizations, including religious ones, particularly Catholics and Mormons. Let us not forget that it was Mormons who contributed the largest amount of money to promote a ballot measure, the purpose of which was to prohibit same-sex marriage in California. Naturally, Mitt Romney, who is a devout worshiper of that religion, took the opportunity to launch an attack on Obama for supporting gay communities.

The other decision that the president took just a few days ago, was to bypass Congress and issue an executive order suspending the deportation of more than 800,000 young immigrants who came to America as children and have lived and attended to their studies in the country. Now they may live without fear of being deported. As he signed the order, President Obama said that they are Americans in every way. This, he added, would make U.S. immigration policy fairer and more efficient. As of now, immigration authorities will suspend all proceedings intended to deport young people who came to the United States before the age of 16, who have lived in the country for at least the past five years, who attend school or who are high school graduates or military veterans. They must also be under 30 and have no criminal record.

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Author: WILLIAM KERN (Worldmeets.US)

Founder and Managing Editor of Worldmeets.US