When is Enough Tribute Enough?


That is what some Americans seem to think:

Again it comes, for the sixth time now — 2,191 days after that awful morning — falling for the first time on a Tuesday, the same day of the week.

gain there will be the public tributes, the tightly scripted memorial events, the reflex news coverage, the souvenir peddlers.

Is all of it necessary, at the same decibel level — still?

Each year, murmuring about Sept. 11 fatigue arises, a weariness of reliving a day that everyone wishes had never happened. It began before the first anniversary of the terrorist attack. By now, though, many people feel that the collective commemorations, publicly staged, are excessive and vacant, even annoying.

I consider this to be a sign of the times we live in. First a big public mourning, constant attention to what happened, but after a while people get bored and want something new (to do). Quite sad, in a way. Although Americans should do in this regard what they think is best, it seems to me that paying tribute to those who died on 9/11/01 can never be outdated. You don’t have to make a spectacle out of it. That is not what it is about or should be about. It is about paying tribute to those who died – their only ‘sin’ was that they worked in America, in the WTC, flew in a plane, worked in the Pentagon and that they lived in a country where they are free.

These people died for democracy and freedom. They are martyrs. Pay them tribute.

More at Captain’s Quarters and Right Wing Nut House (Rick – change the name of the blog, nothing ‘nut’ about it). Cross posted here.

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Author: michaelvdg

  • http://fogghorn.blogspot.com Capt Fogg

    I find it hard to agree that any of these people died for any other reason than that they were murdered. It’s particularly hard to think that any of them thought in their final moment “well at least this is serving Democracy” because it didn’t serve Democracy or freedom or anything else.

    It’s probably only human nature that we go a little bit crazy looking for heroes when we feel humiliated, but there’s really no excuse for it now. There’s no excuse for swooning over symbols and images or for rapturous references to flags or slogans or other patriotic, self-idolatrous claptrap. All of that stuff got in the way of, and still gets in the way of removing the guilty from this world. All that stuff lead us into obedience to a mad president, lead us to weaken Democracy, diminish liberty and surrender to authority.

    We have killed thousands of times more innocents than did Osama and maybe it’s time to take off the angel costumes and stop the sanctimonious tears.

  • http://www.cosmoetica.com cosmoetica

    Capt’s right.

    These people died for nothing. Period.

    Murder victims do not die for any reason other than a murderer’s hate, insanity, or some other delusion.

  • http://mountaininterval.org/ ryan

    First a big public mourning, constant attention to what happened, but after a while people get bored and want something new (to do). Quite sad, in a way. Although Americans should do in this regard what they think is best, it seems to me that paying tribute to those who died on 9/11/01 can never be outdated.

    I’m in that group that you’re calling “bored”, and I think it is a huge mischaracterization. September 11 is no longer about remembering people who died, and how the country came together in the days that followed. Instead, September 11 has become an opportunity for people to push their agenda of how we need to kill terrorists, or get out of Iraq, or elect Republicans/Democrats/whatever; those who hope September 11 passes silently each year are often doing so because it’s painful to see how such a meaningful event has been bastardized.

    September 11 should be about remembering the victims of a tragedy, but more importantly it should be about trying to recapture how the country came together. For that day and the weeks that followed people re-focused on what it meant to be American, and what was important in life. It was impossible to drive down the highway without seeing a flag or other message hanging on every freeway overpass, and American flags were displayed in every car window and in every front yard. However, instead of those memories September 11 now evokes arguments of red vs. blue and “bring the troops home” vs. “cut and run”. Because of that it seems unfair to blame those who choose not to mark the date as simply “bored”.

  • domajot

    ryan said what I think also.

  • kritter

    I agree with Ryan also. 9/11, a national tragedy, has been hijacked by political hacks to promote their agendas. The real meaning- like the meaning of Memorial Day, Christmas and so many other holidays or commemorations has been lost over time.

    In this case, less is more. A simple ceremony that remembers the victims, and perhaps the loss of our collective innocence, would mean more to Americans than multiple jingoistic speeches from those who want to evoke the memory of that day for crass political purposes.

    Every pundit or pol that begins their schpiel by stating that Americans have forgotten 9/11 should realize that we have never been allowed to forget, and that numerous reminders have cheapened the event’s meaning to millions.