The Santorum Joke

If Mitt Romney wins in Iowa next week, he could find nipping at his heels still another challenger.

Two weeks ago, in post-debate stupor, I woozily compared the GOP race to an action movie:

“If the Great Screenwriter in the Sky is following the…plotlines, after all the car chases, explosions and reversals, the eventual nominee is clear: Rick Santorum. He’s been a bit player who has never had a big scene and, by all conventions of the genre, has to be revealed as the powerful genius who has been pulling all the strings.”

Now, with Ron Paul finding there is no statute of limitations on racist rant, life is imitating my lame joke with Santorum running a close third in a new poll.

Who is he and where did he come from?

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Author: ROBERT STEIN

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19 Comments

  1. From your link I discovered this – which would seem to make all polls so far pretty much irrelevant:

    [While Iowa Democrats famously caucus by literally standing up for their chosen candidate, the Hawkeye State's GOP holds secret ballot votes.

    Here's how the unique process will work: On caucus night, would-be voters will gather in 809 locations across the state -- school gyms, churches and auditoriums of all shapes. To participate, each person must be a registered Republican who will turn 18 by the general election on November 6.

    But, in a closely watched twist, voters can switch party affiliation at the caucus and register as Republicans that night.

    "From a process standpoint, it's a nightmare," said Dallas County Republican chairman Mike Elam, "but I think it's a good thing. People can decide they want to be involved up to the very last minute."

    Republicans this year hope that ability leads to a surge of registrations from disgruntled Democrats and independents. But the practice also allows potential cross-party sabotage, where members of one party can participate in a rival caucus in order to vote for the candidate they see as the weakest potential opponent.

    All registrations must be complete by 7 p.m., when the caucuses begin, in order for people to participate.]

    http://articles.cnn.com/2011-1.....M:POLITICS

  2. Ohioan..Why is this bad this year and was not bad when Obama defeated Clinton in 2007 for the Democrat run for the nomination.

    And is this very much different than New Hampshire where they hold open primaries, so anyone from any party can vote in any parties primary?

    Could it be that more open open primaries would lead to more moderate candidates and a much more effective government than what we have today?

  3. I didn’t say it was a bad thing. And it could lead to more moderate candidates.

    It certainly curtails a party’s ability to nominate the candidates they prefer. I’ll leave the decision to the parties who make the rules anyway and thus must abide by them.

  4. The establishment has Romney. The libertarians have Paul. The tea party is desperate to find a credible candidate among the others, starting with Bachmann, then Perry, Cain, Newt, and now Santorum (am I leaving anyone out?). That’s not to say Santorum won’t buck the trend, but even if he doesn’t have the baggage that the others had, it might be too late at this point. As a grass-roots movement, the tea party’s leadershiplessness was an advantage. But once you start to gain power you need to have someone to give that power to. The tea party seems to have failed to make that transition. Maybe if Paul Ryan or Marco Rubio had run…

    (I hereby end my amateur political punditry for now.)

  5. I don’t know why San-timonius, doesn’t come across better. He has some senatorial experience and seems to be knowledgeable, but his persona is one of a zealous kid. I know he is not that young, and I would take him above Newt, Ron, Rick,Michelle,etc., but not before Huntsman, as a president.

    However, I guess I’ll have to go with the mitten man as a candidate.

  6. I think I’d almost rather have Newt than Santorum. He’d love to impose his religious views on the rest of us, is anti-gay and doesn’t like the idea of women being able to obtain birth control or have pre-marital sex.

  7. Santorum along with Bachman and Perry represent the American Taliban (Christian Dominionists). What the Dominionists want is an America based on Biblical law – not much different than Islamic Sharia or Jewish Halakha law. This is about as un American as you can get.

  8. This is about as un American as you can get.

    “Amen” and “thank God” for your comment Ron. (puns intended)

    How the concept that religion is greater than a secular government got started is beyond me.

    What’s frightening is that some take it as something that should be taken seriously.

  9. The Taliban is an inherently militant group. Even if your comparison of their goals is accurate, which is a stretch, that distinction seems rather important, don’t you think?

  10. AD, maybe some of our posters will be less prone to exaggeration next year.

  11. The Taliban is an inherently militant group.

    The Taliban is a miniscule minority of the Islam faith as are the radical clerics that preach violence.

    Like the Westboro Baptist Church, Michelle Bachmann, and Rick Santorum these crazies get a lot of press but don’t represent most Muslims anymore than the examples I listed represent most Christians.

    Islam is a 1300 year old religion when Christianity was 1300 years old they were just wrapping up the Crusades, and the Crusades, unlike Al Qaeda or the Taliban, were sponsored and paid for in full by “The Church.”

  12. So you are “crazy” if you have strong religious beliefs?
    The Pope an the leaders of the other faiths better beware your wrath.
    Rabbi Generic is probably smashing Buddhist works of art as we speak.
    And watch out for MB and RS, cause they will cut your nose off when they get the chance, even if you are of the same faith.

  13. Ron-

    I disagree.

    Organized Religion, as frail and imperfect as it is, is the only advocate for morality we have. Without a moral imperative, social interactions loose trust as a basis for unity. However capitalists thrive within a immoral society. Without morality, we have a return to barbarism. You see, the Victorian era came about as a result of barbaric legal, business, and, interpersonal practices.

  14. So you are “crazy” if you have strong religious beliefs?

    No but you are crazy if you believe that the United States should be ruled under “Christian Law” as some Islamic Countries are run under “Shari’a Law” and both Bachmann and Santorum are on record as to have advocated just that.

    The Westboro Baptist Church is crazy for altogether different reasons.

  15. I guess if you cite some actual in context quotes, I will have to believe you, SK.
    And, please can we leave nut cases, like Westboro and Rev. Wright, out of it.

  16. SteveK, Ron made the comparison to the Taliban. I understand the difference between the Taliban and Muslims as a whole, but that’s beside the point.

  17. Allen- so atheists and agnostics have no moral imperative in their lives? I disagree that we have to have organized religion to have morality and that without it humans return to barbarism.

    Just because you are religious doesn’t necessarily mean that you are more moral than someone who is not.

  18. Any “organization” can be corrupt, fractured, inefficient, but also sometimes useful and helpful, they just are more prone to negative swings because of their size.

  19. “Organized Religion, as frail and imperfect as it is, is the only advocate for morality we have.”

    Sorry dude, but that is utter nonsense.

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